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Stevenston - On This Day In History

Published stories from each town's past.
Penny Tray
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
14 NOVEMBER 1898

OPENING OF BRIDGE AND FOUNTAIN IN STEVENSTON

Several months ago a scheme was set on foot for erecting an iron bridge over the Stevenston Burn, to give more improved access to the beach, the rickety wooden erection being considered unsafe for the numerous pedestrians who resort to the shore.

The scheme was very heartily entered into by a committee, and it was decided in addition to erect a handsome fountain on the open sward near the shore, which is largely frequented by holiday parties during the summer.

Both these enterprises were successfully accomplished.

The drinking fountain, designed by Mr E. W. Findlay, of Nobel's Factory, is of artistic appearance, and besides being useful will be an ornament to the community.

As to the bridge, it is a substantial structure, likely to serve the wants of the community for a long period.

The opening ceremony took place on Saturday afternoon,and was made the occasion of one of the largest demonstrations by trade and friendly societies ever held in the town.

Mustering at the Public School, the procession traversed the main thoroughfares of the town, accompanied by bands, ere proceeding to the ground where the ceremony took place. Nobel's factory employees took a leading part in the proceedings. The fire brigade led the way, followed by the girls in the gelatine and dynamite departments, dressed in their distinctive uniforms, which added picturesqueness to the procession and attracted special attention. Then followed Good Templars, engineers, joiners, Orangemen, Rechabites, plumbers, painters, Irish National Foresters, Shepherds, Free Gardeners, bricklayers, moulders, Freemasons, and committee, the 1st Company Boys' Brigade being a guard of honour and Sergeant Robertson marshal.

Arrived at the ground, where a big gathering had assembled, Mrs Laidlaw was presented with a pair of silver scissors in case, and cut the ribbon which barred the entrance to the bridge, declaring it open amid cheers.

Mr George Sinclair, chairman of the committee, said that he was very much pleased to see so great a gathering at the opening ceremony. As they were all aware, the bridge was inadequate to give proper access to the shore, but, thanks to many kind friends the committee had been able to erect one of the finest bridges in the locality. (Applause.) In carrying out the scheme they had received very kind assistance from Mr McJannet, Nobel's Company, Ardeer Foundry Company, and others, while the tradesmen seemed to vie with each other in giving gratuitous services. All this was a source of great satisfaction to the committee, and he hoped that the community would also be pleased with the bridge and fountain.

Mr Laidlaw said it gave him much pleasure to be present at the opening ceremony. When he came to Stevenston he was astonished at the meagre accommodation for crossing the water, and it was with some trepidation that he passed over the bridge. He thought he might get a wash that he did not require. (Laughter.) He had taken it upon himself to suggest that a better bridge should be erected, and he was glad that the work had been successfully concluded. He thanked them heartily for inviting Mrs Laidlaw to open the bridge and for the handsome souveneir of the ceremony which they had presented to her. (Applause.)

Mrs Lundholm, Nobel House, having been presented with silver scissors, then cut the ribbon and unveiled the fountain amid hearty cheers.

Mr E. W. Findlay then gave an interesting account of the design of the fountain. Afterwards a silver key was presented to Mrs Findlay, who amid ringing cheers, turned on the water.

Mr Laidlaw referred in complimentary terms to the work done by Mr Findlay in designing the fountain.

Votes of thanks were afterwards awarded to the ladies who had assisted at the opening ceremony, to the sculptor (Mr T. Borland), to the chairman and committee, and the proceedings were concluded.
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Penny Tray
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
15 NOVEMBER 1881

BIGAMY

At the pleading diet of Kilmarnock Jury Court yesterday, THOMAS McCANDIE, collier, Stevenston, was charged with the crime of bigamy, in so far as, on 17th June, 1880, he underwent a marriage ceremony with JANET DALZIEL or BAIN, in Main Street, Stevenston, he having previously, on September 19, 1852, been married to Rosalind Lynch,, and now residing at Wilsontown, parish of Carnwath, and he being aware that this woman, his lawful wife, was still alive.

He pled guilty, and, in consideration of the fact that he had been six weeks in prison and of various mitigating circumstances of the case, he was sentenced to one months’ imprisonment.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
16 NOVEMBER 1891

FOOTBALL
DALRY v.STEVENSTON THISTLE


At Dalry, before a good field of spectators.

Neither side scored in the first half, but on changing ends Dalry took up the scoring, and, despite a splendid defence, put on 3 goals to 0.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
17 NOVEMBER 1845

SUICIDE

On Monday evening last, about half-past six o’clock, a son of Mr John Cockburn, blacksmith, Stevenston, who has for some time past been labouring under mental aberration, contrived, with the characteristic cunning of insanity, to escape out of his bed, unknown to his mother and sister.

From thence he proceeded quickly, but deliberately, to the “Turf Dyke Pit” of the Stevenston Colliery, some little distance from his abode, and which is from sixty-eight to seventy fathoms deep.

His mother and sister finding him gone, exercised all despatch in running after him, as they were aware he was not in a condition to take care of himself. They shouted to the night watchman of the pit, who was proceeding to his post for the night, and whom the unfortunate youth passed by, remarking apparently sensibly, ”that it was a good night.” They vehemently urged the watchman to arrest him, but too late.

The young man went straight to the pit-head and jumped down, and consequently was killed; and his body was found in a very mangled state.

He was for some time in the army, in the cavalry department, and received a bruise, which enfeebled him both in body and mind.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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CASUALTY OF WAR
17 NOVEMBER 1917

Died on service, Corporal HENRY STEVENSON, Service No. s/16532, 1st Battalion Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – born at Johnstone; resident of and enlisted at Stevenston.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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CASUALTY OF WAR
18 NOVEMBER 1916

Died on service, Sergeant DONALD HALL KENNEDY, (28), Service No. 14196, Highland Light Infantry – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – born at Stevenston; enlisted at Glasgow.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
19 NOVEMBER 1887

DEATH OF THE OLDEST FREEMASON IN SCOTLAND

Brother JAMES YOUNG, who is believed to be the oldest freemason in Scotland, died at Stevenston on the night of Wednesday last.

Deceased, who was a builder to trade, was initiated a member of Stevenston Thistle and Rose Lodge, Stevenston, on the day that Queen Victoria was born, on the 24th of May 1819, so that he had been a freemason for the long period of over 68 years. He attained his 90th year about a month ago, and two weeks ago was able to take part in the interesting centenary proceedings of his mother lodge.

For more than 40 years he was in the service of the late Provost Barr, of Ardrossan, and travelled regularly from Stevenston to his daily labour, seldom missing a day's work.

As a boy he was present at the laying of the foundation stone of Ardrossan Harbour in 1806, and had a vivid recollection of that ceremony.

As an evidence of the interest he took in the craft, and the indomitable spirit he possessed, it may be mentioned that he persisted in joining the procession at the centenary proceedings, and walked a considerable distance, though he was offered a machine, in order to have his photograph included among the group who were present on that occasion.

Deceased was highly respected by all the brethren of his mother lodge, and by the community of Stevenston, all classes having held him in the highest respect.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
20 NOVEMBER 1846

DEATH

At Stevenston, on the 12th current, Walter Glen, aged 59 years.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
21 NOVEMBER 1892

ACCIDENT ON THE RAILWAY AT STEVENSTON

While John McKinnon was engaged shunting at the Caledonian Station on Friday he fell in front of a waggon and had his legs fractured.

Mr McMath, Stationmaster, who has had ambulance training, rendered assistance in stopping bleeding till medical assistance could be obtained.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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CASUALTY OF WAR
21 NOVEMBER 1917

Died on service, Private WALTER KERR, (32), Service No. 203625, Manchester Regiment – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – born at Oban, resident of Swinton, Lancashire – enlisted at Ardeer – son of Janet and the late John Kerr, 10 Murray Street, Maryhill.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
22 NOVEMBER 1898

ASSAULT

At Kilmarnock Sheriff Court yesterday – before Sheriff Hall – PETER CLARK, senior, and JAMES CLARK, colliers, Ardeer Square, Stevenston, were convicted of having, on the 5th instant, assaulted MARTHA HUGHES or BEATTIE, wife of William Beattie, brusher, Ardeer Square, Stevenston, by striking her several bows on the face and body.

The Sheriff said that on the evidence there appeared to have been some provocation.

Both men have been previously convicted. They were fined in £2 each, or 20 days’ imprisonment.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
23 NOVEMBER 1875

STEVENSTON - BODY FOUND

On Saturday morning last, when the workmen employed at Ardeer Quarry proceeded to their work at seven o'clock, they were astonished to find the body of GEORGE McKEAN, an old man about 80 years of age, belonging to the town, with his head very severely bruised and otherwise mangled, having apparently fallen over the face, a depth of about 40 feet.

They at once communicated with the police, who had the body removed to the house of his son in New Street, where a post-mortem examination was made yesterday by the Sheriff-Substitute and a medical gentleman, who is of the opinion that the man had died on Friday evening about nine o'clock, without a struggle.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.
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