Stevenston - On This Day In History

Published stories from each town's past.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
30 JANUARY 1947

DEATH

MOODIE: At 67 Midton Road, Ayr, on 28th January, 1947, Rev. A. Morris Moodie, senior minister of Ardeer Church, Stevenston, Ayrshire, in his 85th year.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
31 JANUARY 1896

PLOUGHING MATCH

The annual parish ploughing match took place on a field on Ardeer Home Farm, Stevenston. There was a good turnout of ploughs and the spectators were numerous.

The principal winners were: -

Senior:

1st Ebenezer Spiers, Bog;
2nd James Dalgleash, Hillhead;
3rd James Leitch, Middlepart;
4th Thomas Brown, Mayfield;
5th Hugh Lennox, Middlepart;
6th James Cowan, Doura; and
7th John Smith, Corsankell.

Junior:

1st H. Lennox, Kerelaw;
2nd John Smith, Corsankell; and
3rd Robert Graham, Castlehill.

At the close of the match the members of the society dined in the Ardeer Arms, Stevenston.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
1 FEBRUARY 1819

MELANCHOLY SHIPWRECK

The following account of the loss of the TRELAWNEY, West Indiaman, is from the Ayr paper of Thursday, and gives a number of interesting particulars respecting that melancholy event, not inserted in the previous statements.

On Thursday morning last, the 21st current, about 8 o’clock a.m., the ship TRELAWNEY, of Glasgow, of 450 tons, David Reid, master, got under weigh from the Tail of the Bank, Greenock, bound for Falmouth, Jamaica, with a crew of 23 men, besides the master and a passenger, the cargo consisting chiefly of herrings.

On the following morning, about six o’clock, when beating out channel, and when the master and crew, conceiving the vessel was standing for the Heads of Ayr, (wind then abut S.S.W.) were attempting to put her about, she unexpectedly struck upon the sands between Stevenston Burn and Irvine Bar. The land was then caped with snow, the weather thick, and the crew did not perceive land until sometime after the vessel grounded.

They afterwards managed to get her hove round, with her head off the land, but a squall coming on, she again fell upon the beach, wind then about S.E. The whole crew remained by the vessel, with a view to getting her off during the day, but it became unsafe to remain on board, and four of the seamen, viz. Alexander Henderson, George Fairlie, John Connolly, and John Douglas, went ashore in the jolly boat about 3 o’clock p.m., at the risk of their lives, but as the wind considerably increased, none of the rest could follow.

In a short time afterwards, a signal of distress was made, and a line from the ship was floated on shore. Instantly, Messrs Wood, Farrow, and Hughan, shipmasters in Saltcoats, and John Hogarth, a sailor there, with the benevolent view of relieving those remaining by the vessel, took out a boat to the beach, and with it proceeded to the vessel, hauling by the line. At that time there was a heavy sea.

They managed to get aboard of the vessel, where they remained a short time, and were afterwards seen from the shore by a vast concourse of spectators, enter into the boat along with the master of the ship, and ten seamen, James Miller, George Hays, Robert McCormick, James Clarke*, Thomas Brown, George Hall, James McMurray, and other three whose names are unknown, in all fifteen persons, and were then hauled towards the shore by another line from the beach. After they got about half-way, the line from the ship got foul, and broke, the boat upset, and the whole perished.

As soon as the boat was seen to swamp, the whole spectators spontaneously rushed towards the sea, as if they could have rendered them some assistance – but alas! the attempt was in vain.

Mr Farrow’s wife, who had followed him for the purpose of preventing his attempting to go out, but was too late, stood upon the beach, and saw her husband perish with the rest.

Feelings of the deepest grief affected every heart.

The body of one of the ship’s boys, of the name Clarke, after having been about half an hour in the sea, was cast ashore, and every effort was used to restore animation, but in vain.

Before it became dark the ship had the appearance of being considerably damaged, and it was doubted much if the remaining part of the crew would be able to bear it out all night, as no one was inclined to venture out, after the calamitous fate of those in the boat.

Night came on, and there was a prodigious swell, with a smart gale. The wreck was seen floating ashore, and scattered in all directions.

The body of the captain was cast ashore, but none of the other bodies could be noticed amidst the general wreck and confusion.

A number of respectable inhabitants belonging to Saltcoats and Stevenston kept watch all night, so that the wreck might not be carried off. The night was pretty clear, a large fire blazed upon the beach, and the watchmen carried lamps in their hands.

The vessel could be seen from the shore, although not very distinctly, and she appeared to be on her beam-ends. It was thought, ere the dawn of next morning, that the vessel would be entirely broken up, and those on board lost. At this time there were ten men on the wreck, and their sufferings, from want of food, excessive cold, and the sea continually beating over them, exceed all description.

As the sea rose, they ascended the rigging, one or two taking to the main and the rest to the mizzen-mast; and when the ship got on her beam-ends, they were obliged to betake themselves to the main and mizzen-top.

In the course of the night, two of them, Rodger McKenzie, the cook, and William Martin, seaman, became deranged and died; and, in the morning, the cooper in attempting to get to the quarter-deck fell into the sea and was drowned.

About mid-day, a boy, George Landsborough, also was washed off, and although he caught hold of a rope, and two of them got hold of his jacket, they were altogether so feeble as to be unable to save him, and he also perished.

When daylight appeared on Saturday, the vessel was on her beam-ends, and become also a complete wreck. She was driven considerably nearer the beach, and the cries of those on board could at times be heard. The sea still beat with great violence, and it blew a pretty stiff breeze.

Recollecting the scene of the preceding day, few persons were willing still to venture their lives.

The Ayrshire Yeomanry Cavalry were called out on duty. An express was sent to Ayr for the life-boat.

A vast concourse of people were collected on the spot from all the neighbouring places.

At last, before one o’clock p.m., the tide having receded, and there being no appearance of the life-boat, William Orr, shipmaster in Irvine, and four seamen belonging to Irvine, John McDougald, John Murray, William Wilson, and James Malone, came forward and offered their services in attempting to rescue their fellow seamen.

A boat was brought to the spot, and so eager were they in their heroic purpose, that the cavalry were obliged for some time to stand before the boat, and prevent them from entering until by the still farther ebbing of the tide it was considered less dangerous to go off.

At length they were allowed to start, and while on their way the spectators viewed this gallant band with the utmost anxious feelings. Fortunately, they managed to reach the ship, and succeeded in bringing on shore four of the crew, viz. James Wallace, mate; Adam Duncan, second mate; Daniel McDougal, carpenter; and William Pearson, seaman, who were handed down from the main-top.

They again returned, and in the same gallant manner brought on shore the remaining two, one of them the passenger, John Graham, and the other the steward, John Black, who were sitting in a precarious situation on the mizzen topmast. The men thus saved were exceedingly weak and exhausted.

They were immediately furnished with dry clothes and taken to Saltcoats in carts, where they were attended with the utmost feeling and attention by the Rev. James Ellis; William Brown of Parkend; Mr Robert Campbell, vintner; and also by the surgeons and other gentlemen of that place.

The vessel was broke up by the stern, a part of the cargo is washed ashore, but the greater part, consisting of herrings, is still on board, and it will depend on the state of the weather how far the remainder can be saved.

This dreadful event, by which 19 persons have lost their lives, has thrown a gloom over every face in the community.

The four persons belonging to Saltcoats, who lost their lives in the cause of humanity, have all left widows, and the most of them children, to lament their untimely fate. They were all men in the prime of life, and of the most steady and respectable character.

The express, describing their perilous state, reached Ayr, on the morning of Saturday, and the life-boat, manned with shipmasters and respectable inhabitants of the place set off to the wreck. From the great surf on the bar, it was with the utmost difficulty and danger they stood out to sea. By excessive exertion they succeeded, but before they could possibly reach the wreck, the men were saved by the boat from the beach.

Since writing the above, we are informed that Magistrates in Irvine, to mark their sense of the conduct Captain Orr and his followers have presented him with the Freedom of their ancient Burgh, and bestowed a small sum in money on the seamen.

Owing to this melancholy event, by which so many valuable lives were lost, every one of which might have been saved to their friends and country, had a life-boat been at hand, a wish became general in the vicinity, of procuring one by subscription.

In consequence of this, some gentlemen waited on the Earl of Eglinton to solicit his patronage to the subscription intended to be set on foot: however, before they had fully explained the object of their visit, they had the pleasure of being informed by that generous Nobleman, that he had anticipated their intentions, by having previously given instructions to procure a life-boat immediately.

[*Sometimes appears as Clark.]
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
1 FEBRUARY 1901

QUEEN VICTORIA’S DEATH

Stevenston:

The shops will be closed all day on Saturday.
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GLASGOW HERALD
2 FEBRUARY 1912

PIT ACCIDENT

While John Docherty, (17), pit-drawer, was at work yesterday in Auchenharvie Colliery, Stevenston, he was knocked down by a hutch and had his leg fractured. He was removed to his home in Arthur Street, Saltcoats.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
2 FEBRUARY 1914

FOOTBALL – SCOTTISH CUP – 2ND ROUND

Result: - Kirkcaldy, 0; Stevenston United, 4.
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GLASGOW HERALD
3 FEBRUARY 1879

LECUTRE ON AFGHANISTAN

Dr. A. H. Howe, Hullerhirst, delivered a lecture on Friday evening to the members of the Irvine and Fullarton Young Men’s Literary Institute on the aspect of affairs in Afghanistan.

Dr. Wilson, who presided, in introducing the lecturer said that he was well entitled to speak upon the subject he had chosen, having served many years on the medical staff of the Indian Army.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
4 FEBRUARY 1884

FOOTBALL

Result: - Stevenston Dynamite, 0; Kilbirnie, 5.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
5 FEBRUARY 1973

FIRE

The home dressing-rooms and a part of the wooden stand of the Ardeer Recreation F.C. at Stevenston were badly damaged by fire last night.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
5 FEBRUARY 1876

PROPERTIES FOR SALE - ARDEER STORE, STEVENSTON, AND DWELLING-HOUSE FOR SALE

The following property, viz. Ardeer Store (Licensed), with Granary, Back-stores, Byre, and other Offices. The premises are large and commodious, and all fitted up in the most convenient and substantial style for conducting an extensive business. The counters and shelving will be sold with the buildings. The purchaser may also obtain separately the stock-in-trade, store furniture and utensils at a valuation.

This is a rare opening for an enterprising merchant to do a large general business.

The store is licensed for the sale of spirits, &c.

James Campbell, Writer.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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Kilmarnock Herald and Ayrshire Gazette
February 5, 1943

Asked Police To Detain Him

Fifty-seven-year-old Roderick MacLennan is going back to prison.
MacLennan got a job as warder in the Trades Hotel, Stevenston, on December 22. He was supplied with skeleton keys, which gave him access to the cubicles. On December 30, he disappeared. Later, a lodger reported that he had missed his money, which must have been taken from his trouser pocket.

On January 12, MacLennan went to the police station at Old Trafford, Manchester, and asked. the police to detain him on charge of having stolen £21 from this man's trouser pocket.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
6 FEBRUARY 1933

MEN’S HOCKEY

Result: - Irvine, 4; Ardeer, 0.

Ardeer Team: - W. S. Paterson; W. Allison; C. E. (illegible); K. Wilson; W. C. Walmsley; W. Thomson; W. Bond; T. J. Tobin; H. B. Bennett; J. Rowe, and M. Brown.
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