Stevenston - On This Day In History

Published stories from each town's past.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
20 JANUARY 1913

ARDEER GOLF CLUB

Bogey Competition for prizes presented by Mr George C. Guthrie.

Result: - A tie, William Reid, (plus 1); Hugh McKay, (4); and William Wyllie, (8); - all finishing 3 down.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
20 JANUARY 1912

DEATH

McDONALD: At Glenavon, Stevenston, on the 19th instant, Janet (Jessie) Fulton, beloved wife of Carrick McDonald.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
21 JANUARY 1896

ASSAULT

At Kilmarnock Sheriff Court yesterday, Robert Harris, labourer, Stevenston, was charged with assaulting Peter Monaghan, another labourer, in a lodging house at Stevenston on the 14th instant.

He pleaded not guilty but was convicted, and fined in £2 or 30 days’ imprisonment.

Harris seems to have kicked his fellow-lodger very severely and he threatened to murder him with a knife.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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ARDROSSAN & SALTCOATS HERALD
22 JANUARY 1897

CHILD CRUELTY

At Ayr Sheriff Court, on Tuesday – before Sheriff Orr-Paterson – John Harvey, furnaceman, Ardeer, Square, Stevenston, was charged with cruelly ill-treating his son, John, an infant aged eight months.

Accused on Christmas Eve went home, it is alleged, the worse of liquor. He attacked his wife, who ran out of the house. He then lifted the child, who was asleep in its bed, and held it over the fire until its left foot and left arm were severely burned. After which he threw it out of the house on to the ground, causing it great injury.

He pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to twelve months’ imprisonment.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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EVENING TIMES
23 JANUARY 1960

FOOTBALL

West of Scotland Cup – 3rd Round - Result: - Carluke, 1; Ardeer Thistle, 1.

Vernon Trophy – 1st Round Replay – Result: - Ardeer Recreation, 1; Saltcoats Victoria, 1.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
24 JANUARY 1885

MR COCHRAN PATRICK, M.P. - AT STEVENSTON

Mr R. W. Cochran Patrick, M.P. for North Ayrshire, delivered an address at the fourth annual supper of the Saltcoats, Ardrossan, and Stevenston Association, which took place in the Assembly Rooms, Stevenston, last night.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
24 JANUARY 1913

DEATH

McKECHAN: At Mizpah Cottage, Stevenston, on the 22nd January, 1913, Joseph McKechan, aged eight years, beloved son of Alexander and Matilda McKechan.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
25 JANUARY 1955

FORMAL VERDICT IN EXPLOSION - NO NEGLIGENCE

Directing the jury to return a formal verdict into the deaths of two explosives workers in the Ardeer Factory of Imperial Chemical Industries Limited in an explosion which completely destroyed the room in which they were working on October 18, Sheriff G. W. I. Cormack Cohen said at Kilmarnock Sheriff Court yesterday: - "There can be no doubt as to how the men met their deaths. What caused the explosion, however, is still not known." He added that there was no suggestion of negligence.

The men were James Campbell, 21 Windmill Street, Saltcoats, and Archibald O’Hare, 5 Rowanside Terrace, Ardrossan.

They were working in the cartridging house containing 2400 lb. of explosives when the "eruption" as one witness described it, occurred.

William Northcote, 17 Rosa Place, Saltcoats, told how he escaped death by 60 yards. He said that after starting his shift on October 18 he paid a visit to the cartridging house where Campbell and O’Hare were working. He then left them to go to another department and had walked 60 yards when the explosion took place.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
26 JANUARY 1894

ASSAULT

At Ayr Sheriff Court yesterday – before Sheriff Orr Paterson – Thomas Healy, labourer, Stevenston, was charged with assaulting his stepson by striking him on the head with a bowl.

He pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to two months’ imprisonment, and to find £2 caution to keep the peace for six months, or suffer another 10 days’ imprisonment.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
27 JANUARY 1888

STEVENSTON - SMART CAPTURE OF A SUPPOSED THIEF

On Wednesday night Constable McCulloch found a woman named Martha Kirkhope or Lees in Shore Road with a number of wet articles of clothing in her possession. Suspecting that they were stolen he had her conveyed to Saltcoats Police Station where it was learned that the articles had been reported as stolen. The articles were afterwards identified.

The prisoner was conveyed to Kilmarnock, examined and committed to prison.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
28 JANUARY 1819

MELANCHOLY SHIPWRECK

About six o’clock on Friday morning (22 January, 1819), the fine ship TRELAWNEY, 450 tons burthen, of Glasgow, Captain Reid, bound for Jamaica, went on shore on the Ayrshire coast, betwixt Stevenston Burn and Irvine Bar.

There was no communication betwixt the vessel and the land in the morning; but at ten o’clock it came on to blow very hard with a heavy swell, when four of the crew came on shore with a line in the jolly boat, but it unfortunately slipped from the vessel. A cask, however, with a line, reached the shore, and four active adventurous seamen, of Saltcoats, three of them shipmasters, pushed off in a boat and succeeded in reaching the vessel.

Having taken on board the captain and men of the crew, which was as many as the boat could carry, they were returning, when the boat upset, and all on board perished, within 200 yards of the shore, in sight of a great number of people, who could give them no assistance.

The body of Captain Reid, and that of one of the ship boys named Clark, came on shore soon after, but all attempts to restore animation failed.

The remainder of the crew, consisting of nine, with a passenger, were seen clinging to the masts and rigging all day, the sea breaking over the vessel, but no attempt could be made to save them, and four of them dropped off during the night.

The other five seamen, with a passenger, were carried on shore next morning, the weather having moderated, and are fast recovering, from the humane attention they have met with. These six, with the four who got ashore I the jolly boat the preceding forenoon, are all that are saved, nineteen having drowned, including the four men who lost their own lives in the generous attempt to save the lives of others.

The following are the names of those four men: -

Captain Robert Wood, junior;
Captain Samuel Farrow*;
Captain Hughan; and
John Hogarth**, Seaman.

The following are the names of the people saved: -

James Wallace, mate;
D. McDougall***, carpenter;
Adam Duncan, 3rd mate;
Alexander Henderson, boatswain;
John Black, steward;
William Pearson, seaman;
George Fairlie, seaman;
John Connelly, seaman;
John Douglas, seaman; and a passenger.

The vessel is supposed to have broken up. The cargo, fortunately, was not very valuable, consisting mainly of herrings with some plantation stores, a considerable part of which will probably be saved.

[*Sometimes appears as Ferrow; **Sometimes appears as Hougart; ***Sometimes appears as McDougal.]
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
29 JANUARY 1927

HURRICANE HAVOC IN SCOTLAND – GLASGOW STEAMER’S FIGHT WITH GALE

The story of the struggle of the cargo steamer AULDMUIR, of 2747 tons, owned by Messrs Glen & Company, Glasgow, with the gale, and her ultimate stranding on the Ayrshire coast a few hundred yards north of Irvine Harbour, is one of determination and first-class seamanship against overwhelming odds.

DRIFTING SHOREWARD

The AULDMUIR left Heysham on Tuesday night for Troon, and was off the latter port on Wednesday afternoon. Signalling for a pilot to take him into Troon Harbour, Captain Cuthbertson stood by in very wild weather, hoping that he would get his vessel safely berthed before evening. The pilot boat came out, and after some time she got alongside, but the gale was so strong and the seas so heavy that the smaller vessel was in imminent danger of being dashed against the side of the larger and seriously damaged. Ultimately the pilot was able to board the AULDMUIR. The tug continued to lie alongside, in considerable danger but unable to get away, until Captain Cuthbertson dropped his port anchor. Then the pilot boat cleared and the AULDMUIR was left to fight the gale.

The wind was still rising, the port anchor was dragging, and the vessel was drifting nearer the shore. The captain then dropped his starboard anchor, and also started his engines at full speed ahead in support of his anchors. The position remained like this overnight, and yesterday it showed no improvement. The anchors were barely holding, even with the assistance of the engines, and about noon it was evident that the vessel was drifting shoreward. Then the starboard anchor dragged, and ultimately the chain of that anchor gave way. It was then evident, as the force of the gale had not decreased, that the ship was in imminent danger of stranding.

LANDING THE CREW

The captain gave orders to get the lifeboat ready, and to serve out lifebelts. This was done. Soon afterwards the vessel struck, and the lifeboat was lowered, with 10 of the crew on board. There had been attached to the boat a length of strong rope sufficient to reach from the ship to the shore, and this was paid out as the boat went shoreward, the intention being to pull the boat back to the ship. The rope was attached to one of the seats in the boat, and the seat gave way under the strain, so that the boat could not be hauled back in this way. Then the captain gave instructions to fix a hatch to the end of the rope to allow it to drift ashore, so that the rope might again be attached to the boat. This was done, but by the time the hatch reached the shore the members of the crew who had been landed had left.

Fortunately, however, some of the workers from Nobel’s Dynamite works (near which the vessel struck) were on the spot, and they understood and did what was required, and ultimately the lifeboat was taken back to the ship.

Another group of the crew was then landed, leaving on board only Captain Cuthbertson, the chief engineer, and one other officer, all of whom stood by the ship pending further developments.

The crew were sent by train to Glasgow, where they arrived late last night. They were taken to the Sailors’ Home at the Broomielaw, and are being provided there with food and board until they can arrange to leave for their homes.

The vessel, it may be added, lies on a fine sandy bottom. Late last night the ship appeared to observers to have been driven almost on to the sand hills which bound the eastward side of Messrs Nobel’s explosives works.
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