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Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Published stories from each town's past.
Penny Tray
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray »

GLASGOW HERALD
6 NOVEMBER 1870

ARDROSSAN - PAROCHIAL BOARD

On Thursday evening the usual monthly meeting of this Board was held in Saltcoats - Mr Ingram in the chair.

The Inspector read the following extract from a minute of the Board of Supervision, dated 30 October, 1870: -

"The Board having ascertained that there still exists in some parishes a mistaken and pernicious system of paying paupers' aliments, in whole or in part to other parties, instead of the paupers themselves, consider it expedient to call the attention of all Parochial Boards to the impropriety of such practice. It also provides that 'the payment of lodgings of paupers should all be included in their aliment, except in the case of bed-rid or helpless persons, who are unable to look out for lodgings for themselves.' "

A discussion followed, in the course of which several members gave it as their opinion that the present procedure of the Board was wholly at variance with the provision of the minute.

The Inspector explained that the minute had originated through some anomalous conduct on the part of the Inspector of Newton-on-Ayr Board, and several members thought it did not affect the Ardrossan Board.

Ultimately it was agreed to postpone the matter till a future meeting.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
7 NOVEMBER 1806

THE GLASGOW, PAISLEY, AND ARDROSSAN CANAL

At a numerous and respectable meeting of the proprietors of this canal, held at Paisley on 6th November, 1806, the Right Hon. the Earl of Eglinton in the chair, it was unanimously resolved “that the whole revenue that may arise from the ports of the of the canal as completed, shall be applied towards executing the other portions of the undertaking, and that no dividends whatever shall be made until the whole extent of the canal be finished, and a junction thereby formed with the harbour at Ardrossan, which is already in great forwardness.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
7 NOVEMBER 1817

DEATH

On the 30th October, at Ardrossan, where she had gone for the benefit of her health, Janet Agnes Elizabeth, daughter of James Grierson, Esquire, of Dalgoner.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
7 NOVEMBER 1842

ARDROSSAN HARBOUR

This harbour has all along laboured under great disadvantages in affording no opportunity for repairing ships whose bottoms may have received damage.

We understand this disadvantage is about to be removed by the erection of a patent slip.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
7 NOVEMBER 1855

BODY WASHED ASHORE AT ARRAN

There was cast ashore on 3rd November, at Corriegills, near Brodick, the body of a female, apparently about 40 years of age.

She is attired as follows: -

A dark printed cotton gown, a red and blue striped petticoat, with one or two white flannel petticoats underneath, white worsted stockings, but no shoes, a cap on her head, and a double row of black glass beads about her neck. In her pocket were found fourpence in coppers.

As the body is not much decomposed it will be left unburied till Wednesday next, in the hope that it may be identified and claimed by the relatives.

It is not unlikely that this may be the body of the female who cast herself out of the Arran steamer a few days ago.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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CASUALTY OF WAR
7 NOVEMBER 1916

Died on service, Lieutenant JOHN RITCHIE BROWN, Royal Army Medical Corps – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – second son of the late Dr. and of Mrs J. Ritchie-Brown, 14 Montgomerie Street, Ardrossan.

The Ardrossan & Saltcoats Herald subsequently reported: -

“It is with sincere regret the news was received that Lieutenant J. Ritchie Brown, R.A.M.C., had been killed on service.

Lieutenant Brown was a member of a well-known and highly esteemed family, and as a young man was well liked for his many good qualities. Wherever his lot was cast he made friends; winning their confidence by his professional skill and their affection by his warm and generous sympathies.

Lieutenant Brown was the second son of the late Dr. J. Ritchie Brown, Saltcoats, and of Mrs Brown, 14 Montgomerie Street, Ardrossan. Born in Saltcoats in 1873, he was educated at Ardrossan Academy and Stanley House, Bridge of Allan, and he graduated M.B., C.M., at Glasgow University in 1897.

For a time he was house surgeon at Teignmouth Hospital, and he also acted as assistant to Dr. Dunlop, Dalmellington. During the South African war he was civil surgeon to the Field Force, and later settled in Rhodesia under the B.S.A. Company. Returning to this country he joined the R.A.M.C. and he has been seven months at the front.

At the time of his death, Lieutenant Brown was attached to the R.C.A.

Referring to his loss, his Colonel writes: -

“He was a most loveable character. He was a gallant man, always ready to help and most fearless in carrying out his duties.”

Lieutenant Brown leaves a widow, who resides in London. To her as well as to the sorrowing mother and sisters and his brothers, Dr. Mackenzie Brown, Dalry, and Mr Elles Brown, genuine sympathy will be extended.”
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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CLYDEBUILT SHIPS
7 NOVEMBER 1942

THE VESSEL EVELEEN SINKS

The steel screw steamer EVELEEN, which was built by Ardrossan Dry Dock & Shipbuilding Company, and launched on the 4th of June, 1920, sank while on a voyage from Whitehaven to Belfast with coal, after a collision with the ORCHY, off Grey Point, Belfast Lough.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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Kilmarnock Herald and Ayrshire Gazette
November 7, 1947

Food Parcels for "Shell" Workers

Last week a ballot took place at the "Shell" Refinery, Ardrossan. It was to decide who would be the lucky recipients of food parcels from their contemporaries overseas. Employees of the company in Australia and Venezuela are sending parcels varying in weight from 6 lbs. to 22 lbs. to employees in Britain and Holland.

There are approximately 6000 "Shell" workers in Holland and 10.000 in Britain but the share to Ardrossan Refinery is expected to provide a parcel to three out or every four employees. Those of the 250 odd employees at Ardrossan who are unlucky in the ballot will come first in any subsequent consignment.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Meg »

My dad was back in Shell from the can factory then- wonder if he was one of the lucky ones.

Meg
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
8 NOVEMBER 1871

ARDROSSAN TOWN COUNCIL

On Monday evening, the Council held their usual monthly meeting, under the presidency of Bailie Currie.

It appeared that a staff of men is about to be organised for the fire engine, and that two new crossings are about to be laid in Prince's Street.

The mode of carrying out the provision of the Forbes Mackenzie Act formed the subject of a conversation; but the matter was ultimately delayed.

An interesting report from Doctor Robertson as to the sanitary condition of the town was read, and the inspector instructed to carry out the suggestions embodied in it.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
9 NOVEMBER 1818

FOR LEGHORN AND GENOA

The first class brigantine BARON ARDROSSAN, having the great part of her freight engaged, will be despatched in ten days.

For freight, apply to Messrs Hugh Milliken & Company, Port Glasgow; Mr John Rankin, Greenock, or Campbell & Company, Tontine Buildings, Glasgow.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
9 NOVEMBER 1891

VESSEL ASHORE NEAR ARDROSSAN

About four o’clock on Saturday morning the schooner MARGARET MITCHELL, of Tarbert, light, bound for Ardrossan, ran the south-western point of the Horse Island, close to the pier. A strong breeze was blowing from the south-west at the time.

The captain reports that it was dark, and he did not sight land until a few moments before the vessel struck, and in the heavy swell she nearly rolled over.

Early in the morning the pilots saw the stranded vessel, and reported it to the harbourmaster, who immediately proceeded to the spot with the tug LORD ELGIN and a pilot boat. They found the vessel lying dry on a reef of rocks with the keel broken and rudder unshipped.

The crew, with their effects, were brought ashore.

The tug with towlines on board, again put off to the schooner. After standing by for some time, it was found impossible to get ropes to the vessel, as the sea was breaking heavily over the reefs to windward, and all hope of towing her off was abandoned, as wind and sea increased rapidly.

Yesterday the vessel was driven further on the rocks and she will probably go to pieces.
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