Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Published stories from each town's past.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
1 MARCH 1954

BOY DROWNED IN TANK

Robert Shearer, aged 4, the son of Police Constable John Shearer, 159 Glasgow Street, Ardrossan, was drowned on Saturday in an emergency water tank. The boy with his brother, aged 6, and two friends, had gained access to a fenced area which contained the tank. Robert, apparently thinking the water was shallow, stepped into the tank, and sank into 15 feet of water.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
2 MARCH 1818

TO THE PROPRIETORS OF THE GLASGOW, PAISLEY, AND ARDROSSAN CANAL

The Committee of Management beg leave to notify, that a summons has been raised before the Court of Session, and served on the Members of the Committee, at the instance of the Right Hon. the Earl of Eglinton; the Right Hon. Mary, Lady Montgomerie; Lady Jane Montgomerie; William Blair of Blair; John Smith of Swinridgemuir; Robert Jamieson, merchant in Lochwinnoch; William Stevenson, mason there; Matthew Crawford residing there; James Orr of Langyeard; John Kirkwood, in Millhouse; Thomas Taylor, factor, residing in Lochwinnoch; James Connell, chandler, there; Robert Caldwell, writer, there; Hugh Kirkwood, in Tofts; and Daniel Kerr, in Highfield; Members of the Company.

The object of this action is to have it found and declared that the rates and revenues of the canal cannot be applied in payment or relief of the debts or obligations incurred in defraying the expense of forming the canal from Tradeston to Johnstone.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
2 MARCH 1818

SINGULAR MARRIAGE

A man employed in the works at Ardrossan, was on three different Sundays proclaimed in the two parish churches of Ardrossan and Stevenston, for marriage.

Monday was the day appointed ‘for tying the hymeneal’. In the afternoon, the bridegroom went to Saltcoats to meet the bride, who lived in Stevenston, accompanied with music, etc., when to his amazement, the bride did not appear, and upon inquiry she had changed her mind, but the bridegroom (a true son of Hibernia) was not to be disappointed of a wife – he immediately applies for another, obtains her consent, and presents her as if the bride, and they (the circumstance unknown to the reverend clergyman) were married, and are now to every appearance happy.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
2 MARCH 1864

SHIPPING NEWS

Belfast, February 25 – The MARY RICHARDS, Scott, from Ardrossan for Genoa, which put in here on the 8th February, leaking, has discharged her cargo; and is going into dock.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
2 MARCH 1910

PROTEST AGAINST SUNDAY STEAMERS

At the meeting of Ardrossan Presbytery U.F. Presbytery yesterday a report on Sunday Observance stated that a complaint had come from Arran that there was an increase in laxity among visitors in the observance of the Lord’s Day. It was asserted that some of the office-bearers in the city churches seldom or never entered church while on holiday.

The possibility of extension of Sunday steamer sailings to Arran was also referred to, and the hope expressed that such would never take place.

It was agreed that the Presbytery renew their protest against Sunday steamer traffic on the Clyde.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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Penny Tray wrote: Wed Feb 28, 2024 7:27 am GLASGOW HERALD
28 FEBRUARY 1913

DEATH

BROWN: At Dundrennan, South Beach Avenue, Ardrossan, on 26th February, the Rev. John Brown, minister emeritus, Kinclaven United Free Church, in his 76th year.
GLASGOW HERALD
3 MARCH 1913

KINCLAVEN MINISTER DEAD

The death is announced at Ardrossan of the Rev. John Brown, minister emeritus of “the Kirk of the Muir,” Kinclaven, in his 78th year. He was born at Douglas, Lanarkshire, and studied at the U.P. Divinity Hall, Glasgow.

On completing his course, he was called simultaneously to Buckie and Kinclaven. Accepting the latter, he was ordained there in 1865, and remained till December, 1909, when, owing to advancing years and failing health, he retired, and took up residence in Ardrossan.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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Penny Tray wrote: Fri Feb 23, 2024 8:50 am GLASGOW HERALD
23 FEBRUARY 1910

DEATH

DUNLOP: At 9 Arran Place, Ardrossan, on 22nd instant, Mary Lamb, wife of Adam Dunlop, hairdresser.
GLASGOW HERALD
4 MARCH 1910

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT - DUNLOP

Mr Dunlop and family gratefully acknowledge the many expressions of sympathy received during their sad bereavement – 9 Arran Place, Ardrossan.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
4 MARCH 1911

DEATH - HOGARTH

At the Linn, Ardrossan, on the 2nd March, Mary Allison, in her 91st year, widow of John Hogarth.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
4 MARCH 1912

DEATH - KENNEDY

Drowned at Ardrossan Harbour, on the 27th February, Robert Snodgrass Kennedy, marine engineer, husband of Jeanie McLean, and youngest son of the late Rev. Robert Kennedy, of Montreal, Canada.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
4 MARCH 1913

WILL AND ESTATES

Mr James Cook, of Union Bank House, Ardrossan, solicitor, of the firm of Messrs J. & T. K. Cook, Solicitors, of Ardrossan - £12,860.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
5 MARCH 1864

KILMARNOCK SMALL DEBT COURT

At this Court on Thursday, John Wilson, late butler with William Hinshaw, Esquire, Ardrossan, sued that gentleman for £12, being the restricted amount said to be due for one month’s wages and board, and also as solatium for wrongous dismissal, and being given into the custody of a policeman.

Mr Hinshaw, junior, who engaged Wilson, denied that any period of warning was fixed upon, and explained that Wilson had brought summary dismissal upon himself by his own misconduct.

About the middle of January last, Wilson had committed an assault on the housemaid, and the circumstances having reached Mr Hinshaw’s ears, he was told to leave. Wilson begged that he might be allowed to remain in the house a few days longer, in order that he may look out for another situation, which was agreed to.

On the fourth day thereafter, he absented himself from the house the entire day, with the exception of a short interval, and when he returned about midnight Mr Hinshaw, junior, desired him to leave instantly. Wilson refused to do so, and a constable was sent for, who took him away and provided bed and breakfast for him in the Eglinton Arms Hotel.

The Sheriff said the action was one of the most unfounded within his remembrance, and the defender was accordingly assoilzied, with costs.

[The Hinshaw family lived at 3 South Crescent, Ardrossan.]
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
5 MARCH 1912

INTERESTING DISCOVERY AT ARDROSSAN CASTLE

Another interesting discovery has been made at the old castle of Ardrossan, the ruins of which are situated on an eminence overlooking the town.

About two years ago several underground chambers were found there, and in the old church nearby a remarkable stone coffin, attributed by experts to the twelfth century, was discovered some time afterwards.

Excavations at the castle have recently been renewed by the Town Council, and much of the debris within the walls has now been cleared away.

At a depth of about 12 feet beneath what was till a few weeks ago the grass grown surface the men who are engaged at the work of clearing came upon a mass of fallen masonry which appeared to block a passage leading downwards. This obstacle being removed, a long flight of stone stairs was discovered. Lights were procured, and it was then found that the stair led to a well about 4 feet square, neatly built and vaulted overhead.

There seems to be little doubt that this is the well referred to by Timothy Pont in the year 1600.

“Ther is,” says Pont, in his Topography of Cuninghame, “one thing to be admired in the Fontaine of frech vatter vich is in a vault in this castell, for it, lyke the sea, ebbs and flowes two severall tymes each 24 houres. The resonne is from ebbing and flowing of the salt sea rich environs the rocke quheron the castell standes, and at each surge, vith horrible repercussiones, regorges the frech vatter, not letting it issew from its spring, and so makes the fontaine swell.”

In Pont’s time the sea washed the rocks at the base of the Castlehill, but the Glasgow & South-Western Railway has been constructed where the shore used to be. Oddly enough, there is at the present time a spring of water issuing from the rock close to the railway, and it is not improbable that this is connected with the newly discovered well, in which it may be mentioned, the water appears to be clear and wholesome, although daylight has not reached it for at least 200 years and probably a great deal more.

There are in all 27 steps leading to the well, which is fully 30 feet below the point at which the excavations were commenced.

It is expected that expert archaeologists will be invited to examine the place.
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