Stevenston - On This Day In History

Published stories from each town's past.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sat Oct 10, 2020 10:48 am

GLASGOW HERALD
10 OCTOBER 1884

THEFT

At Kilmarnock Sheriff Court yesterday, SARAH BARCLAY or MURPHY, wife of John Murphy, collier, Main Street, Stevenston, was charged with the theft on the 20th ultimo of a Swiss clock from the public house of James Gibson, Fullerton Place, there, the clock being the property of Robert Smith, watchmaker.

She pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to 14 days’ imprisonment.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Tue Oct 13, 2020 8:25 am

GLASGOW HERALD
13 OCTOBER 1870

AID TO THE WOUNDED

There has been raised in this village and country district around £17 13s 6d, and at Ardeer Iron Works and Stevenston Colliery, in the immediate neighbourhood, £8 11s, making a total of £26 4s 6d, which – less 4s 6d of expenses – has been remitted to the treasurer of the fund in Glasgow, for equal distribution among the sick and wounded of both belligerents.

[This refers to the victims of the Franco-Prussian/Franco-German War – 19 July 1870 to 10 May 1871.]
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

Post by Hughie » Wed Oct 14, 2020 11:05 pm

Kilmarnock Herald
October 14, 1949

Going to the Dogs

Tenants in Boglemart Street have been complaining that on the nights the dog racing track is lit up their household lights go down and wireless sets become almost inaudible. The District Council are drawing the attention of the electricity authority to the matter.

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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Fri Oct 16, 2020 8:25 am

GLASGOW HERALD
16 OCTOBER 1877

CASE UNDER THE MINES REGULATION ACT

At Kilmarnock Sheriff Court yesterday JOHN WHITEFORD, collier, Stevenston, was charged with a contravention of the Mines Regulation Act, 1872, in so far as on several occasions in July last, he being then employed to inspect with a safety lamp before the time of commencing work in the No. 5 pit of Auchenharvie Colliery, and also to make a true report of its condition as regards ventilation, said pit being a mine in which fire-damp has been found within a period of twelve months, he failed to record in the book kept for that purpose his report as to the ventilation of the pit.

The accused pleaded guilty.

The Procurator Fiscal explained that Whiteford had made the required inspection through he had failed to make a report. No accident resulted, and the case was brought forward more as a warning than with a view to punishment being inflicted.

The Sheriff, in these circumstances, imposed a nominal penalty of 5s – at the same time expressing a hope that it would be a warning to persons in similar positions that the Act must be rigidly enforced.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Fri Oct 16, 2020 8:25 am

GLASGOW HERALD
16 OCTOBER 1882

FOOTBALL – AYRSHIRE CUP TIE
IRVINE ACADEMICALS V. DYNAMITE, STEVENSTON


These clubs met at Irvine on Saturday to play off the undecided tie, a protest by Irvine Academicals having been sustained against the regularity of the previous match.

An exciting match concluded in a crushing defeat for the Stevenston club, the goals being – Irvine 5, Stevenston, 0.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sun Oct 18, 2020 8:59 am

GLASGOW HERALD
18 OCTOBER 1877

STEVENSTON SCHOOL BOARD

This board met in the new Public School on Monday evening – Dr. J. R. Brown in the chair.

Mr. Lithgow called attention to the irregular attendance of many scholars, and to the fact that a number were sent to work before 13 years of age, or being properly advanced in their education.

It was remitted to Mr. Lithgow and the clerk to prepare a circular to employers calling their attention to their legal responsibilities, and requesting their co-operation in promoting the educational interests of the parish.

An account for interest and instalment of loan for new school, amounting to £59 2s 6d, was ordered to be paid.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sun Oct 18, 2020 9:01 am

GLASGOW HERALD
18 OCTOBER 1879

MELANCHOLY PIT ACCIDENT AT STEVENSTON – TWO LIVES LOST

Yesterday morning two men named ROBERT MACDONALD, fireman, and FRANCIS O’BRIEN, brusher, were accidently killed in Lucknow Pit.

It appears that O’Brien and a man named ROBERT McKEAN were engaged during the night in making the roof secure in a portion of the pit prior to the miners resuming work. Macdonald, who acted as foreman, was superintending the work going on in the pit.

About half-past three o’clock in the morning a portion of the roof suddenly gave way, carrying with it the wooden supports and burying Macdonald and O’Brien beneath the fallen mass. When the bodies were recovered both men were found to be quite dead.

Macdonald leaves a widow and three young children.

About three years ago he met with an accident in the same pit by which he lost an arm, and on that occasion his comrade, a man named Hyslop was killed. O’Brien leaves a widow.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Mon Oct 19, 2020 7:51 am

GLASGOW HERALD
19 OCTOBER 1888

TRAVELLING EXPENSES OF PAROCHIAL BOARD MEMBERS

In reply to an inquiry by the Stevenston Parochial Board as to the legality of the payment of travelling expenses of delegates to the meetings of the Cunninghame Combination Poorhouse Board, the Board of Supervision has stated that the payment is at least of doubtful legality as well as propriety.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Tue Oct 20, 2020 7:32 am

GLASGOW HERALD
20 OCTOBER 1871

MINERS’ MEETING

A meeting of miners was held in the Masonic Hall, Stevenston, yesterday to hear an address from Mr. Alexander McDonald, M.P. The meeting was held at 12.30 p.m. and a large number of miners were off work for the day.

Mr. William Gemmell, tailor, was in the chair, and introduced the speaker, who argued that the exceptionally high rate of wages among miners and ironworkers generally, which prevailed during last winter, was caused by the Franco-German war, which decreased production in both countries engaged in that deadly struggle; that Germany from the enormous indemnity which she exacted from France, was unable to make, and did make larger purchases in the iron market than her own resources were able to supply, and even taxed the resources of this country, and hence the unprecedented rise in wages.

Mr. McDonald further declared that he had been the friend of the miner all his life long, and was not going to desert him now.

At the close of Mr. McDonald’s address resolutions were passed in favour of a more vigorous support of the miners’ local union, and in favour of maintaining the restrictions of working hours and of darg.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sun Oct 25, 2020 9:00 am

GLASGOW HERALD
25 OCTOBER 1833

WOMAN KILLED

A few days ago, as an old beggar woman, almost blind, belonging to Stevenston parish, was going out at the end of Dalry village, she was met by two horses with carts, and not seeing, or being unable to get out of the way, she was overturned by the horse of the first cart, when the wheel went over her knee and foot, and crushed them so severely, that she died.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

Post by Hughie » Tue Oct 27, 2020 10:11 am

Ardrossan & Saltcoats Herald
October, 27, 1905

Tramways

Stevenston folks are being asked this week to state, by means of a reply card, whether they are in favour of the "proposed tramways which are to run through Stevenston, Saltcoats, and Ardrossan to Seamill and Portencross."

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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Wed Oct 28, 2020 9:37 am

GLASGOW HERALD
28 OCTOBER 1882

COURT OF SESSION – A STEVENSTON POLICE COURT CASE

In this case an appeal was taken against a decision of Magistrates in the Police Court, Stevenston, by which a farmer in the district was found guilty of disorderly conduct and breach of the peace was fined 30s.

Mr. Kennedy, for the appellant, agreed that the conviction ought to be quashed on the ground that it proceeded partly on the judicial confession of the appellant and partly on evidence, and because while the case was heard by two magistrates, the sentenced was signed only by one, who did not sign as preses.

Mr. McKechnie, for the respondent, maintained that the evidence, apart from the judicial confession, was sufficient to justify the conviction, and, further, that the appellant admitted the offence by voluntarily paying the fine.

He further held that in these small burghs they could not expect minute attention to technical points. The Procurator Fiscal, he believed, received a salary of only £9, and the clerk probably less. They could not expect much technical skill for such salaries.

Lord Young – “We might expect £9 worth.”

The Lord Justice-Clerk thought the appeal must be sustained. The Magistrates proceeded to convict upon a statement which was held to be a confession made at the bar. It was trite law that unless a prisoner pleaded to the whole charge, and unless the prosecutor accepted that plea as short of the whole charge that amounted to a plea of not guilty.

It was admitted that the whole case was not proved, and that the conviction proceeded partly on this imperfect and restricted plea. For such a case there was no conviction at all. As to the acquiescence he thought the case was very feeble. There was no mode of appeal handy, and the appellant paid the fine rather than go to prison.

He was disposed to hold that the sentence was radically vicious and that the appeal must be sustained.

Lord Young concurred.

Lord Craighall, also acquiesced. As to the statement in extenuation made by Mr. McKechnie that the officials of the Court were very poorly paid, this was not an excuse for irregularity, but rather if the officials of the Court were such as had been represented that the prosecution should not be brought before that Court.

The appeal was accordingly sustained and £7 7s expenses allowed.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

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