Stevenston - On This Day In History

Published stories from each town's past.
Penny Tray
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
17 AUGUST 1896

STEVENSTON THISTLE SPORTS

On Saturday there was a large turnout at Warner Park at these sports, and the weather was very favourable. There were eight events on the card, the contests proving very interesting. Good music was provided by Saltcoats Flute Band.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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CASUALTY OF WAR
17 AUGUST 1915

Died on service, Private DAVID GRANT, Service No. 8583, 4th Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – born at Kilmarnock, enlisted at Kilwinning; husband of Annie Haire or Grant, (24), Bridgend, Kilwinning;

Annie subsequently remarried and settled in Stevenston, where she remained until her death in 1969.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
18 AUGUST 1876

DEATH

At Ardeer Iron-works, Stevenston, Ayrshire, on the 17th instant, aged 24½ years, Peter, third son of George Beattie, and late of Hunter, Barr & Company, Glasgow.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
18 AUGUST 1884

ARDEER BOWLING CLUB

The half-yearly meeting of this club was held in the bowl house at noon on Saturday, at which there was a good turnout of members.

The accounts were laid before the meeting and approved of. The funds, under the careful management of Mr McIsaac, were found to be in a flourishing condition, and it is hoped that money now being plentiful, the green will be kept to first class order.

A match between the married and single members, which was to have taken place in the afternoon, was postponed owing to the unfavourable weather.

The customary dinner took place in the clubhouse in the evening, at which there was a good turnout of members. The customary toasts were duly pledged, several excellent songs were sung, and an enjoyable evening was spent.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
19 AUGUST 1875

BOWLING

Stevenston:
A game was played on Tuesday between six rinks of Kilwinning and an equal number of Ardeer players, with the following result: -

Ardeer, 149; Kilwinning, 105.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
19 AUGUST 1878

BOWLING - KERELAW, STEVENSTON v. ARDROSSAN

Three rinks from each of these two clubs met on Friday night on Kerelaw green to play a friendly return match of 21 ends. The weather was fine, and a pleasant game resulted as follows: -

Kerelaw, 50; Ardrossan, 66.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
19 AUGUST 1897

STEVENSTON - SUDDEN DEATH

Last night about half past five, an outdoor worker, named AGNES MEECHAN or KNUCKY, dropped down dead on the floor of her house in Townhead Street.

Death is attributed to heart disease.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
20 AUGUST 1888

SHIPMENT OF DYNAMITE

Nobel’s Explosives Works have been very busy for some time past. On Saturday three cargoes of dynamite were shipped from the beach north of Irvine Harbour – one for Liverpool, another for Greenock, and a third for Furness.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
21 AUGUST 1876

SUPPOSED LOSS OF FOUR LIVES

A boat, 21 ft. keel and 7 ft. beam, with the name “MOSQUITO” outside and “B. D. Co. Ltd.”! Inside, which has been identified as belonging to the British Dynamite Company (Limited), Stevenston, came ashore at Corriegills, about two miles from Brodick Pier, on Saturday morning.

The boat, manned by four men (two of whom were practical seamen) named Gemmell, Wood, Boyd, and another man whose name has not been ascertained, left Stevenston on Thursday for Fairlie with a cargo of ballast for a yacht which is being built there for the Dynamite Company.

They arrived at Fairlie all safe, but since leaving there nothing has been heard of the boat till a yacht, on Friday afternoon, about three o’clock, passed her on her beam-ends about a quarter of a mile off the north end of the Holy Isle. The yacht, on arriving at Lamlash about half-past seven in the evening, reported her to the Coastguard, who went to look for her, but returned after a three hours unfruitful search.

When found on the shore, the mast was broken, but it is believed it did not break till it touched the ground, and there was a reef in the mainsail and foresail.

Unless the men (who were all married except Boyd) have been picked up by a passing vessel, it is to be feared they have been drowned.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
22 AUGUST 1892

A VIOLENT WIFE

At Kilmarnock Sheriff Court on Saturday ELIZABETH LUNDIE or McMEECHAN, wife of an irondresser, residing in New Street, Stevenston, pled guilty to assaulting her husband, and was fined £2 or 20 days.

She was the worse of drink when her husband came in, and on asking for his supper she threw a bowl at him.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
23 AUGUST 1875

THE LATE BOAT ACCIDENT AT IRVINE

On Saturday, the body of another of the three Kilmarnock excursionists recently drowned by a boat accident at Irvine was discovered on the shore between that port and Stevenston. The features and hands were completely eaten away, but it was identified from the clothing, etc., as the remains of John Stewart, brother-in-law of the two others.

The body of Robert Osborne was found, as already reported, on Sunday week, but that of David Osborne has not yet been recovered.

Stewart was 32 years of age, and has left a wife and four children.
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

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GLASGOW HERALD
24 AUGUST 1875

THE LATE BOAT ACCIDENT AT IRVINE – ANOTHER BODY FOUND

All the bodies of the three Kilmarnock excursionists, recently drowned by a boat accident at Irvine, have now been recovered, the remains of David Osborne having been found yesterday on the shore between Irvine and Stevenston, near the spot where the body of Stewart, the brother-in-law of the two Osborne’s, was discovered on Saturday.

Stewart’s remains were interred yesterday, and the friend, returning from the funeral, found a telegram awaiting them with intelligence of the discovery of Robert Osborne’s body. He was 19 years of age, and was employed as a baker at Govan.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.
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