Stevenston - On This Day In History

Published stories from each town's past.
Penny Tray
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Tue Feb 23, 2021 9:00 am

GLASGOW HERALD
23 FEBRUARY 1889

SUNDAY DRINKING IN STEVENSTON

At a public meeting on Thursday night, Rev. J. Livingstone, who presided, moved a resolution regretting that owing to the operation of hotel licenses and lax administration of the Closing Act the peace and quietness of the Sabbath were broken by people under the influence of drink.

Dr. Bird seconded.

Mr Paterson moved, and Mr Oswald seconded, that the attention of the Justices be called to the facilities for getting drunk by numerous back entrances to public houses, and requesting, wherever practicable that such entrances be shut up.

The motions were agreed to.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sat Feb 27, 2021 9:44 am

GLASGOW HERALD
27 FEBRUARY 1874

CELEBRATATORY DINNER

To celebrate the recent victory in North Ayrshire, a few members of the committee entertained the electors and active non-electors on the Conservative side in the parish of Stevenston to supper in the Shell Hotel on Wednesday evening. Covers were for about 70.

Mr Patrick Warner of Ardeer occupied the chair, and the croupiers were Mr W. Lockhart, Mayfield, and Mr Andrew Pollok, storekeeper.

The usual loyal and patriotic toasts were given and drunk with great enthusiasm.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

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Re: Stevenston - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sun Feb 28, 2021 9:04 am

GLASGOW HERALD
28 FEBRUARY 1872

GREAT MEETING OF MINERS IN AYRSHIRE

A meeting of the miners employed in Ardeer Iron Works was held on Friday in the Masons’ Arms Hall, Stevenston, for the purpose of considering the question of adopting eight hours as a day’s work.

A chairman having been appointed, a report was taken from the several pits, which showed that nearly all were idle for the meeting, and that the men were each day employed fully thirteen hours at work.

Mr John Brown, Galston, explained the various movements amongst the Ayrshire miners during the last eighteen months to get up wages. In speaking on the eight-hour system, he disclaimed having any intention of creating strife between masters and men.

After considerable discussion, it was agreed to begin on the eight-hour system on the 6th March, 1872.

It was also agreed to go on with the Union.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

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