Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Published stories from each town's past.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sat Apr 03, 2021 8:01 am

GLASGOW HERALD
3 APRIL 1876

TRADE REPORT

The shipments of pig iron at Ardrossan Harbour for the week ending today were: -

Coastwise, 1142 tons; Foreign, 30 tons; Total, 1172 tons.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sat Apr 03, 2021 8:01 am

GLASGOW HERALD
3 APRIL 1879

DEATH

NEILSON: At 10 Barr Lane, Ardrossan, on the 31st ultimo, Thomas Neilson, aged 64 years.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sat Apr 03, 2021 8:04 am

CASUALTY OF WAR
3 APRIL 1915

Died on service, Stoker 1st Class, C. CEILEY, (21), Royal Navy, HMS BONETTA, Service No. K/14378 – Theatre of war, Home – buried at Ardrossan Cemetery.

[The Commonwealth War Graves Commission list no further information than above, and the name CEILEY doesn’t appear on any of the Threetowns war memorials. Unless I come across anything further, I have to assume that deceased died at Ardrossan or that his body was carried to Ardrossan for burial by HMS BONETTA simply because the ship was in the area.]
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sun Apr 04, 2021 8:28 am

GLASGOW HERALD
4 APRIL 1870

VESSEL SPOKEN

CITY OF BOSTON, from Ardrossan to Boston, off Lamlash, April 2.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sun Apr 04, 2021 8:28 am

GLASGOW HERALD
4 APRIL 1871

VESSEL SPOKEN

G. W. JONES, from Ardrossan to New York, February 26, in latitude 50N, longitude 19W.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sun Apr 04, 2021 8:29 am

GLASGOW HERALD
4 APRIL 1874

ARDROSSAN PAROCHIAL BOARD

On Thursday evening, the monthly meeting was held in Saltcoats Town Hall. There was a good attendance. Dr. Brown presided.

Mr Alexander Ingram, late chairman of the board, was appointed auditor in room of Dr. Marshall, resigned.

It appeared from the financial statement that the board had a sum of £1350 at their credit in the bank.

The Local Authority Committee then held a meeting.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sun Apr 04, 2021 8:32 am

GLASGOW HERALD
4 APRIL 1879

ACCIDENT ON THE RAILWAY

Yesterday forenoon, a guard on the Glasgow & South-Western Railway, named William Munro, while uncoupling some waggons at Eglinton Ironworks, near Kilwinning, got crushed between one of the waggons and the tail lamp.

He was brought to Ardrossan, where he resides, and placed under medical care.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sun Apr 04, 2021 8:32 am

GLASGOW HERALD
4 APRIL 1879

MARRIAGE

HUNTER – HUNTER: At Chapelhill Farm, Ardrossan, on the 3rd instant, by the Rev. George Philp, East U.P. Church, Saltcoats, William Hunter, Glasgow, to Kate, youngest daughter of the late Robert Hunter, Farmer.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Hughie » Sun Apr 04, 2021 10:49 am

More details about the Hunters of Chapelhill are in this earlier topic: viewtopic.php?p=176073#p176073

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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Mon Apr 05, 2021 8:41 am

GLASGOW HERALD
5 APRIL 1877

ARDROSSAN INDEPENDENT CHURCH

This congregation have held their annual business meeting, at which the Rev. Alexander Cross, the pastor, presided.

Mr James Blair, the treasurer, submitted his annual financial statement, which was highly satisfactory, and while doing so intimated his resignation of office. The report was adopted, and a cordial vote of thanks awarded Mr Blair for his services during the past nine years.

Mr John Anderson, merchant, was appointed treasurer in room of Mr Blair.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Mon Apr 05, 2021 8:42 am

GLASGOW HERALD
5 APRIL 1878

SHIPPING CASUALTY

The ship HUNTRESS, of Ardrossan, with a cargo of timber, went on a rock opposite Camusnagaul on Thursday night. She lay there all day, and it was not expected that she could be got off easily, but in the evening at high tide she slipped off without injury.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Mon Apr 05, 2021 8:43 am

GLASGOW HERALD
5 APRIL 1879

GALLANTRY REWARDED

The London Gazette intimates that the Queen has been graciously pleased to confer the Albert Medal of the First Class on Captain Peter Sharp and John McIntosh, A.B., of the ANNABELLA CLARK, for saving life in the River at Bayonne, in connection with the burning of the French ship MELANIE.


GLASGOW HERALD
24 OCTOBER 1879

HEROISM REWARDED

Yesterday forenoon there was a large attendance in the Town Hall, Ardrossan, to witness the presentation of a gold medal of the first class from the French Government to Captain PETER SHARP, master of the ANNABELLA CLARK, and also the Albert Medal of the first class from Her Majesty the Queen, and a gold medal of the Second Class from the French Government to Mr. JOHN McINTOSH, carpenter.

The Albert Medal had also been awarded to Captain SHARP, and was presented to him at Newport, by the Mayor of that town.

These medals were bestowed on Captain SHARP and Mr. McINTOSH for their bravery in rescuing, at the imminent risk of their own lives, the crew of the French ship MELANIE, which caught fire on the night of the 20th November, 1878, with 500 barrels of petroleum on board, while lying in the river at Bayonne.

Provost Barr occupied the chair.

Mr. W. Muir, collector of Customs, stated that the Provost, in making the presentation, was acting on behalf of Her Majesty.

Lord Sandon had submitted a statement of the services rendered and after considering it the Queen had in her own handwriting ordered that these two medals should be given to Captain SHARP and Mr. McINTOSH, and he was sure the audience would think them well worthy of the reward.

Mr. Cook, at the request of the chairman, read the following document, an extract from the London Gazette, 4 April, 1879: -

The Queen has been graciously pleased to confer the Albert Medal of the first class on:-

Captain PETER SHARP and JOHN McINTOSH, A.B., of the ‘ANNABELLA CLARK’, of Ardrossan.

The following is an account of the services in respect of which these decorations have been conferred: -

On the 20th of November 1878, at about 5.45 p.m., a fire suddenly broke out on board the French ship ‘MELANIE’, which was lying in the River Adour, at Boucan, near Bayonne, loaded with 500 barrels of petroleum, of which 40 were on deck. A mass of flame shot up from the main hatch and the ship quivered all over from the explosion of some of the barrels. The ship’s seams opened at once, and the petroleum pouring through spread a belt of flame around the ship. The master and a seaman then jumped overboard, but the mate remained to try to save his son who was lying helpless under some heavy objects which had fallen on him.

Captain Peter Sharp, master of the ‘ANNABELLA CLARK’, of Ardrossan (which was lying close by in the river), accompanied by a seaman named JOHN McINTOSH, came at once to his assistance. They rowed their boat through the flames, picked up the seaman who had jumped overboard, and took the mate from the blazing vessel.

Captain SHARP and McINTOSH both sustained very severe injuries. It was feared that Captain SHARP would lose the sight of one eye, and JOHN McINTOSH the use of his hands.

The chairman then, in very complimentary terms, presented the Albert Medal to Mr. McINTOSH, and the French medals to Captain SHARP and Mr. McINTOSH.

Both recipients modestly acknowledged the honours they had received, and expressed their belief that many other of their countrymen would have acted similarly in similar circumstances.

Rev. J. Hector de Courcelles, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, remarked that the fame of the noble deed performed by Captain SHARP and Mr. McINTOSH had extended over England. He had lately received a letter from a gentleman, a stranger to him, who thus alluded to it: -

Colonel Grove’s compliments to the Vicar of St. Andrew’s, Ardrossan, and begs the favour of giving the enclosed paper to that brave man JOHN McINTOSH, asking him at the same time to write and tell him if he ever received the French medal. It is as well to add that Captain SHARP’s splendid acts did not begin with his boarding the French ship MELANIE, for several months before his vessel was lying to in the Western Ocean in a heavy gale of wind, when a vessel in distress hove in sight. He then sailed near, and signalled to the crew that he should run round her without touching her, and the crew must jump on board; and this was successfully done. It was a bold and noble act. Had the vessels touched, both might have gone down.

Such deeds, Mr. de Courcelles added, conferred honour on the British Navy and the British Flag, and taught a lesson of unselfishness and noble heroism that he would like to see more carried out.

A vote of thanks to the Provost brought the proceedings to a close.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

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