Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Published stories from each town's past.
Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 13558
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sun Jan 05, 2020 10:17 am

GLASGOW HERALD
5 JANUARY 1895

THE LOSS OF THE LOVEN

A public inquiry, at the instance of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, with the concurrence of the Committee of the Ardrossan Branch, was held yesterday in the Town Hall, Ardrossan, as to the causes which prevented the lifeboat CHARLES SKIRROW, from reaching the wreck of the brig LOVEN, of Christiania, off Horse Island, during the storm on Saturday, 22nd December.

It will be remembered that a volunteer crew secured a rowing boat and succeeded in rescuing the first mate, the second mate, and an able seaman, while the captain and a steward and three men were drowned.

Mr. Cunninghame Graham, deputy chief inspector of lifeboats presided at the inquiry, and was assisted by Mr. Keppel Foote, district inspector of lifeboats, and the district committee.

There was a large attendance of the public.

The chairman in opening the proceedings, said that he had been instructed by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution to hold an inquiry into the action of the Ardrossan lifeboat on the 22nd December, when, as was well known to them all, she was unable to reach the wreck of the LOVEN to rescue the crew. The Lifeboat Institution courted the fullest publicity in all its actions. It was supported by the public, and it was due to them that all its actions should be made known to them, and that there should be no concealment. This remark applied whether the criticism was favourable or unfavourable to the institution. The present case had called forth considerable comment in the public press. It was true the correspondence had been anonymous and the local committee at Ardrossan were the first to see the necessity of having an investigation. For several days past advertisements had been put in the papers requesting those who had interested themselves in the matter by writing to the papers to come forward and assist in the inquiry, but, unfortunately, none of them had done so, and it rested with him and his colleagues to obtain from the best available sources the fullest account possible of what took place on the day of the wreck. It was their purpose to bring out all the facts of what took place by examining witnesses, no matter whether it was to the advantage or disadvantage of the Lifeboat Institution. After the evidence had been taken a report would be issued.

CAPTAIN D. MURPHY, coxswain of the lifeboat was the first witness. He stated that he had followed the occupation of a seaman for forty years, and previous to joining the service of the Lifeboat Institution had had experience of shops’ lifeboats.

On the 22nd of December he was on duty at the pilot-house, and left shortly after nine o’clock for breakfast. The direction of the wind at that time was north-west, and it was blowing a perfect hurricane. It was nearly high tide.

After breakfast he went to the New Dock and heard a rumour that a vessel was ashore on the Horse Island. He then made signals for the lifeboat crew to assemble and when the men arrived he told them to stand by in readiness, as he did not know whether or not there were any people on the vessel.

He was told that Mr. Craig, the harbour manager, and Captain Shields, the harbourmaster, desired to see him. On going to them they were anxiously looking through glasses at the wreck, but they saw no one on board. They thought it very unwise to attempt to put off the lifeboat owing to the severe hurricane.

At half-past eleven witness observed someone clinging to the lower topsailyard of the vessel. He then went out and got five horses to take the lifeboat to the north beach, and, when he came back the coxswain had the lifeboat in readiness. It was then a little past high water. He thought it very unwise to start from the north beach, as it was very dangerous to leave from the beach and go through the sound, which was only 400 or 500 feet in breadth, and where there was only five or six feet of water.

One of the tugs was damaged, and the other could not be got out of the harbour owing to the gates of the dock being closed.

He then consulted Captain Shields, and they came to the conclusion that it was best to launch the lifeboat from the pilot-house.

The arrangements made with Captain Shields were that he should try to pull round the north end of the breakwater, and if that failed, he would try to get the LORD ELGIN, one of the tugs, to his assistance. The hurricane at this time was coming from the north-west. They managed to get to the north end, but owing to the wind and the strong current they were driven back to the steps at the breakwater. It was about low tide then, and they were unable to keep the boat in position owing to the shoal water. He then tried to move under sail, but the distance being short and the place shallow, he could not use the drop keel. Even with the assistance of four oars on the lee side and other means the lifeboat would not stay; they could not keep her up to the wind. He then had to wear, and in doing so she touched the sand. He was driven back to the south-end of the breakwater to wait on the tug.

By this time – half-past three o’clock – the gale had abated, and a ship’s lifeboat, manned by six sailors, proceeded to the wreck, and, he was proud to say, were successful in rescuing the survivors.

BY THE CHAIRMAN – It would have been dangerous to launch the lifeboat from the parapet. It was impossible to lower the boat by the crane, because the fires were put out by the sea, and there were no means of working the crane by hand. The only other method would have been to launch the lifeboat off the carriage, which would have been unsafe. He had never been out in the lifeboat in a gale. The crew were exercised every quarter on certain dates, and they did not confine the exercise to specially rough days.

THE CHAIRMAN – Of course it is the wish of the institution that the boats should be taken out in moderately rough weather, so as to accustom the men to the boats.

Examination of witness continued – In his opinion it was impossible to pull the lifeboat against a gale of wind, and the harbour was too narrow to permit of her being sailed. In the open he did not know what she might do. He looked upon it as a recognised thing that the boat was to be towed out in a heavy gale, but unfortunately on this occasion the tug was not available. The crew consisted of five boatmen, five seamen, four pilots, and himself. All the men had had a great deal of experience.

BY CAPTAIN FOOTE – The reason the lifeboat was not launched earlier was because they could not get steam up in the crane, the fires having been put out. He thought it was dangerous to launch her from the quay wall, because she would be dashed against the wall. She might, however, have been launched with a crane, and it might have been possible to keep her off by a rope from the opposite wall. He would have gone out again, but he waited for the tugboat, and thought it was no good endeavouring to get out without it. He did not know of anyone offering to man the boat. The men on the brig were drowned early in the morning before anything was known on shore about the wreck. It was, therefore, not through any action of the lifeboat that the lives were lost. The crew of the lifeboat did the best tin their power, and they were all competent men. In trying to launch the boat he himself fell into the water from the quay wall – a distance of about 20 feet – but this did not deter him from going out again.

JOSEPH TROUT, chief officer of the Coastguard, stated that he thought the boat could have been launched at Ardneil Bay, about six miles away, where there was a sandy beach and no stones. They would have had to pull the boat across a field from the road to get to the beach. They might also have launched the boat at Seamill, about 4 miles off. He did not know the pace at which the boat could have been drawn along the road, and he was not aware that 2½ miles an hour would have been very good work. He told the coxswain about eleven o’clock that there were men in the rigging of the brig.

BY CAPTAIN FOOTE - The lifeboat might have gone out at least when the small boat went out. If the lifeboat had been double-banked when she first went out she might have been got away. He had never seen a heavier gale. They could have secured plenty of horses to draw the boat.

EX-PROVOST HOGARTH spoke of the violence of the gale, and said it would have been a very difficult matter to drag the lifeboat along.

THOMAS NIBBS, coastguardsman, watched the wreck from nine till eleven o’clock. At the latter hour he saw a man in yellow oilskins in the rigging, but there had been no sign of life on board previously. He had been on wreck service in lifeboats at Dungeness in very severe weather, and was in a boat when two men were drowned. He thought that if the Ardrossan boat had been double-banked when she was put into the water she could have been pulled outside from the north entrance. As a precautionary measure he thought the lifeboat could have been moved along the beach early in the morning.

BY CAPTAIN FOOTE – He did not think the boat could have been taken out under oars before one o’clock, but she might have been launched from the quay wall, which would have meant a drop of 20 feet into the water.

CAPTAIN SHIELDS, harbourmaster, at Ardrossan, deponed that if the tug had not been disabled the lifeboat could have reached the wreck in about twenty minutes.

The HON. G. R. VERNON, chairman of the Ardrossan Harbour Company, said that the tugs of the company were always at the service of the Lifeboat Institution free of charge. Having seen the lifeboat at different times and noticed the great difficulty that was experienced in launching her, he could quite understand that with the gale on the 22nd December it was next to impossible to launch her along the shore. Had the tugboats been available he had no doubt the boat could have been got out, but unfortunately one of the tugs was damaged and could not be of use; and the other was locked in the old dock owing to one of the gates being damaged.

BY THE CHAIRMAN – He could not remember any other occasion on which the lifeboat was unable to go out, because the tug was always ready. He was afraid that, situated as the lifeboat was, it would be most difficult to get her out without the assistance of a tug.

MR. JOHN CRAIG, harbour manager, spoke of the difficulty of launching the lifeboat even in fine weather. She was never better managed than on the day in question. So far as he remembered the small boat which effected the rescue was only about twenty minutes away.

MR. R. L. ALPINE, shipping agent, Ardrossan, urged that the lifeboat should be placed in a position from which it could be launched into deep water at any time. As Norwegian Consul and as representing the owners of the vessel wrecked, he was relieved to learn that no loss of life had occurred owing to the delay in the harbour.

WILLIAM PLLU, who was in charge of the small boat which rescued the men from the wreck, described the steps he took to reach the vessel. When he thought the lifeboat was not going out he asked Captain Shields if that was the case, and received the reply that she was not to be launched. He called for volunteers and after he got them he set about securing a boat. Ultimately he got one from the Ardrossan Shipbuilding Company, and they made a start. After experiencing some rough weather they reached the brig, when the survivors were rescued.

BY THE CHAIRMAN – There was plenty of sea room for the lifeboat, and there was nothing to hinder her going out with sails by the south entrance. The sails were not well set, they were only hove-out.

(A VOICE, “You’re a damned liar!”)

THE CHAIRMAN said that the inquiry was to be conducted orderly, and he hoped there would be no more of these remarks.

EXAMINATION CONTINUED – He thought the crew of the lifeboat did their level best, but it was a failure.

Why did she not get out? – The men know that best themselves. There were dozens of men on the quay, who could have taken the boat as well as I could quite easily; I say that without any fear of contradiction.

Several of the rescuers gave evidence, and a number of seamen and fishermen made suggestions as to how the lifeboat could have been got out.

CAPTAIN SHIELDS was recalled, and stated that he did not tell Pllu that the lifeboat was not going out.

This was all the evidence.

THE CHAIRMAN then read a letter from Mr. Neil Currie, Octavia Terrace, Shawlands, who stated that he was the author of the letter which appeared in the Herald under the signature “N.C.,” and that he did not wish to come forward as a witness because he did not see the lifeboat launched. He suggested, from his knowledge of Ardrossan, that a smaller lifeboat would be more suitable. The chairman said that this letter raised the question whether they should put a smaller boat on the Ardrossan station, and he would be pleased to lay the matter before his committee. They had tried to get at the bottom of the matter for which the inquiry was held to discuss, and he and his colleague, Mr. Foote, would draw up a report, which would be read in the Town Hall on Monday.

The usual votes of thanks brought the proceedings to a close.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 13558
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Mon Jan 06, 2020 11:19 am

GLASGOW HERALD
6 JANUARY 1902

BIRTH

AIRD: At 17 Seton Street, Ardrossan, on the 4th instant, Mrs. Edward Aird; a daughter.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 13558
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Mon Jan 06, 2020 11:20 am

GLASGOW HERALD
6 JANUARY 1906

DEATH

WYLLIE: At 75 Glasgow Street, Ardrossan, on the 5th instant, William Wyllie, aged 34 years, Glasgow & South-Western Railway Company, beloved husband of Annie Irvine.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 13558
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Mon Jan 06, 2020 11:21 am

GLASGOW HERALD
6 JANUARY 1937

NEGLECTED WIFE AND FAMILY AT ARDROSSAN

Before Sheriff-Substitute James M. Inglis at Kilmarnock Sheriff Court yesterday CHRISTOPHER HILLEN was charged with having, between February 13, 1927, and December 29, 1936, at the dwelling-house at 6 Hill Street, Ardrossan, neglected his wife and two children, whereby the became chargeable to the County of Ayr.

He pleaded guilty and was sentenced to three months’ imprisonment.

Mr. D. Harvey, solicitor, Kilmarnock, prosecuting, said that the accused left Ardrossan for America in 1923. He obtained work there, and sent remittance to his wife until 1927. He arrived in Ardrossan just before Christmas, and stated that he had returned from America in March, 1936.

The total cost to the Public Assistance Authority in keeping his wife and children was £580.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 13558
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Tue Jan 07, 2020 9:07 am

GLASGOW HERALD
7 JANUARY 1857

SCOTTISH AND IRISH SAILINGS – (EXTRACT FROM A LARGER ARTICLE)

So sufficiently had the Clyde steamers, hitherto at least, furnished accommodation for the conveyance of passengers and goods between the west coast of Scotland and Belfast, that, with the exception of a short competition of six months during the spring and summer of 1841, by a steamer called AYRSHIRE LASS, which ran from Ardrossan to Belfast, in connection with the Ayrshire Railway Company, no competition against the Clyde steamers could be said to have existed in any part of this route prior to 1844.

At this date, however, it seems to have struck certain parties that the requirements of trade between the West of Scotland and Belfast were not sufficiently met.

With a view of providing for this deficiency, and realising profit to themselves from the speculation, a company was started, who purchased a steamer, named the GLOW WORM, of 291 tons, and 100 horse-power, which in 1844 they placed on the station between Ardrossan and Belfast, in connection with the Ayrshire Railway, sailing her three times a week from each port.

The following year the company built the FIREFLY, of 374 tons and 170 horse-power, to run as a consort with the GLOW WORM.

The competition between these two routes continued with more or less keenness from 1844 to 1851, when an arrangement was entered into between the Ardrossan Company and the owners of the Clyde steamers as to fares, rates of freight, number of sailings, &c., which was acted on by both parties down to the withdrawal of the Ardrossan Company from the field in 1855.

With a view to ascertaining whether any demand existed for a day steamer between Belfast and Greenock, the Messrs Burns placed the fast steamer THETIS, which had been built expressly for the day service, on the passage during the months of August, September, and October 1845, starting her from Belfast and Greenock each alternate morning at 9 a.m. But after having plied during these three months most preferred by travellers, this favourite steamer, and so giving the day service the fairest possible trial, it had to be abandoned.

The Ardrossan Company tried, for a much larger period, a similar experiment, but with no better success.

Travellers from Scotland to Ireland seem to prefer a night passage and sleep, to a day passage and scenery.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 13558
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Wed Jan 08, 2020 9:01 am

GLASGOW HERALD
8 JANUARY 1825

SHIPPING CASUALTY

Extract of a letter from Ardrossan, received here last night, dated 29 December, 1825: -

“A sloop which had come out of Troon, was observed off Ardrossan about three o’clock this afternoon, seemingly bound up the Clyde, carrying a main-sail, jib, and fore-sail. It was then blowing a strong gale from the S.W. when suddenly her bow was observed to run under water, and she became to all appearances unmanageable. She continued in this state for only about ten minutes, when she went down in about six fathoms of water, a quarter of a mile from the harbour of Ardrossan, where she is lying fair upon her bottom, from her top sail being visible, and quite upright, and above water.

Although she went down so suddenly and unexpectedly, DAVID LISTON, son, and another seaman, went out to the wreck at the peril of their lives in about twenty minutes after, but could discern none of the crew, who appeared from shore to be only two in number, both had sunk to rise no more. They, however, brought in her small boat to this harbour, her stern inside, marked, JOHN WILSON, and outside the NELLY AND MARGARET, of Greenock.

If the gale continues as at present for any length of time, she will likely break up, but if it fortunately take off, she may be quite easily lifted.

I am of the opinion she is loaded with coals.”
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 13558
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Wed Jan 08, 2020 9:03 am

GLASGOW HERALD
8 JANUARY 1895

REPORT ON THE ARDROSSAN LIFEBOAT INQUIRY

The adjourned public inquiry into the causes which prevented the Ardrossan lifeboat CHARLES SKIRROW from reaching the wreck of the Norwegian brig LOVEN, which stranded on the rocks between Horse Island and the breakwater in the gale of the 22nd ult., was held in the Town Hall, Ardrossan.

Mr. Charles Cunningham Grahame, Deputy Chief Inspector, Royal National Lifeboat Institution, presided, and he was accompanied by Lieutenant Keppel Foote, District Inspector.

There was a fair representation of the local committee, and a large attendance of the general public.

The Chairman said the report was divided into two parts – first, an abstract of evidence; and secondly, his conclusions drawn from the evidence.

The conclusions were as follows: -

1. The depositions of the survivors of the LOVEN conclusively show that the unfortunate loss of life from that ship occurred about two hours before it was known in Ardrossan that a wreck had taken place, so that happily the responsibility for this sad event can in no way be attributed to the failure of the lifeboat to put out later in the day.

2. That the willingness of the coxswain and his crew to render all assistance was shown by the prompt way in which they assembled when called upon.

3. That the chief causes of the delay in launching the lifeboat were undoubtedly owing to an unfortunate train of quite unprecedented circumstances – namely, the fires for working the crane (used in launching the boat) having been put out; the damage to one tug, and the inability to get the other out of the old dock owing to the injury to the dock gates.

4. That as soon as it was known that there was life to be saved, and that the crane was not available, I cannot help thinking it would have been advisable to have taken the risk of launching the boat off the carriage with guy ropes from the quay wall opposite, although I am aware that the drop would have been somewhere about 15 feet into a depth of water of some 13 feet. Notwithstanding that there was considerable turmoil of sea, the risk of life would have been involved in taking this course. I, however, entirely concur in the decision of the coxswain not to attempt to launch from the north shore, especially as the tide was falling, and the nearest available place at least 4½ miles distant.

5. With regard to the management of the lifeboat when once afloat, the evidence is of a most contradictory nature, but I do firmly believe that during the strength of the gale coxswain and men did the utmost in their power, according to their views, to reach the wreck. It would have been more satisfactory if, when the gale abated the lifeboat had made another attempt under oars, double banked if necessary, instead of waiting for the tug, which should have picked them up in case of failure. I am most fully alive to the fact that the coxswain found himself in a very difficult position, and how easy it is to criticise after the event. The custom of being towed out being considered the recognised way of getting clear of the harbour no doubt placed the coxswain at a great disadvantage, compared with those who are accustomed to rely entirely on their own resources in boat-work.

6. I am extremely doubtful whether, during the height of the gale, the boat could have got out of the harbour without the assistance of a tug.

In conclusion I take the opportunity of pressing the importance of exercising the lifeboat in at least moderately rough weather. The system hitherto adopted of naming a day, perhaps a week in advance, is not satisfactory. Inspections must necessarily be arranged for in advance, but the other two quarterly exercises need not be fixed on until it is seen that a day is suitable. It is a well-known fact that no man, whether fisherman or sailor, can possibly be acquainted with the capabilities of a lifeboat unless opportunities of this sort are taken advantage of.

The report closed with an expression of thanks to the harbour manager, the harbourmaster, and others for the trouble they had taken in connection with the inquiry.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 13558
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Thu Jan 09, 2020 9:23 am

GLASGOW HERALD
9 JANUARY 1901

OPENING OF NEW MUNICIPAL CHAMBERS

Last night the present Commissioners of the burgh of Ardrossan, and one or two representatives from the neighbouring burgh of Saltcoats, were the guests of Provost Young at Kilmahew House on the occasion of the opening of the premises as Municipal Chambers.

Provost Young occupied the chair. A short programme of speech and song made an hour pass pleasantly.

The mansion house of Kilmahew was built for the late Provost Barr, and occupied by him as a residence for many years. It stands in Montgomerie Street, enclosed, and with a considerable extent of ground attached.

The development of the town, the extension of the harbour, and the coming of the Lanarkshire and Ayrshire Railway were the chief among several causes which altered the character of the immediate surroundings, and led to many changes in the tenancy of the house. Several attempts were made to build up a hotel business in it, but none succeeded.

Of recent years the house stood empty till the Commissioner acquired it, with the immediate result just indicated, and the prospect of erecting a new Town Hall on ground available within the feu.

Within the building offices are provided for the town-clerk, the burgh surveyor, the water manager, and the collector of the burgh rates, a Council hall, and a commodious reception room.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 13558
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Thu Jan 09, 2020 9:24 am

GLASGOW HERALD
9 JANUARY 1906

DEATH

SHAW: At 46 Eglinton Road, Ardrossan, on the 7th instant, Mary Robertson, beloved wife of Charles J. Shaw.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 13558
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Fri Jan 10, 2020 9:27 am

GLASGOW HERALD
10 JANUARY 1894

BREACH OF PROMISE CASE – YOUNG GLASGOW WOMAN SUES AN ARDROSSAN BUTCHER

Proof was led before Sheriff Hall, in Kilmarnock Sheriff Court yesterday, in an action at the instance of MARGARET WILSON SMITH, 471 New Keppochhill Road, Glasgow, against ANDREW CURRIE, 24 Winton Street, Ardrossan, claiming £100 for alleged breach of promise of marriage.

Pursuer, aged 22 years, resides with her father, and the defender, who is 27 years of age, is in the employment of John Harvey, butcher, Glasgow Street, Ardrossan.

Mr. Robert Wylie, solicitor, Kilmarnock, on behalf of Mr. McDowall, writer, Glasgow, was agent for the pursuer, and the defender was represented by Mr. W. D. McJannet, writer, Irvine.

At the outset of the case the defender’s agent took objection to an amendment which had been made on the petition so as to include seduction. This had altered the ground of action and was therefore incompetent.

The Sheriff allowed the proof to proceed, reserving the objection.

The pursuer, in her evidence, stated she became acquainted with defender in Glasgow five years ago, in consequence of her family being accustomed to lodge in the house of defender’s mother during their summer holidays.

At that time the defender was employed in Rutherglen, and during the next two months he often called at pursuer’s father’s house and began to show marked attention to pursuer and to keep company and to walk out with her. At the end of two months defender obtained employment in Ardrossan, and since then he had resided there. He had correspondence with her until last February. He asked her to marry him, and she agreed to do so, but it was not decided when the marriage was to take place. He said he would marry her when he had a shop of his own.

She had written defender twice after February, and he never answered her. Her father then went to see him with the object of receiving an explanation. She was deeply attached to the defender, and might have married him though he had not a shop of his own. He had given no explanation or reason for breaking off their marriage.

Pursuer stated that in consequence of the intimacy between them she gave birth to a child on 11th October, of which the defender was the father.

She had made preparations for the marriage, and incurred between £5 and £10 of expenses.

The defender said that pursuer’s father asked him in July, 1893, if he was going to marry pursuer. He had not previously spoken to the pursuer about marriage. He had intended to marry her when he had a shop of his own. He was earning 31s a week. He had no money in the bank or laid past.

He denied that he was the father of the pursuer’s child.

Proof was closed, and the case was continued for debate.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 13558
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Fri Jan 10, 2020 9:28 am

GLASGOW HERALD
10 JANUARY 1890

THE COMMISSIONERS AND THE JOINT HOSPITAL

At the monthly meeting of Commissioners of the Burgh of Ardrossan as Local Authority, the annual report by Doctor Allan, medical officer, showed that during last year two Ardrossan cases had been treated in the hospital for enteric fever, and that these were the only cases in the burgh which terminated fatally.

A letter was read from the clerk to the Joint Hospital Committee, inquiring what drain the sewage from the new hospital could be connected with. It was mentioned in the letter that the sewage would be treated under the septic tank system before being discharged into the drain.

Provost Young suggested that the Local Authority should lay a connection from the nearest existing point to the point in the burgh boundary nearest to the hospital. He desired that the suggestion should apply to gas and water as well as to drainage, and he justified it on the ground that the extension would soon be imperatively demanded for the convenience of feuars.

Bailie Harvey put the suggestion in the form of a motion. £6000 had been spent, he said, and it would be very foolish to refuse such necessaries as water and drainage.

Provost Young explained that Irvine Corporation, which supplied Saltcoats with water, had offered to supply the hospital also.

Captain Shields moved, as an amendment, that the Hospital Committee be granted permission to make the connection with any points already existing in the burgh. Bailie Smith seconded.

The expense of building the hospital had been borne by both Ardrossan and Saltcoats, he said, whereas the motion would have the effect of making the cost of drainage, water supply, and gas, to be borne in unfair portion by Ardrossan alone.

The amendment became the finding of the meeting.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 13558
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Fri Jan 10, 2020 9:29 am

GLASGOW HERALD
10 JANUARY 1902

MARRIAGE

RITCHIE – BROWN: At 10 Arran Place, Ardrossan, on the 8th instant, by Rev. John Brown, Kinclaven, uncle of the bride, assisted by Rev. James W. Purves, Erskine Church, Saltcoats, Alexander J. Ritchie, Saltcoats, to Christina Hunter, youngest daughter of Andrew Brown.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Post Reply