Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Published stories from each town's past.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Mon Nov 25, 2019 4:52 am

GLASGOW HERALD
25 NOVEMBER 1896

DEATH

JAMIESON: At 70 Princes Street, Ardrossan, on the 23rd instant, William Jamieson, photo artist and cycle agent, Ardrossan and Beith, in his 57th year.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Tue Nov 26, 2019 9:43 am

GLASGOW HERALD
26 NOVEMBER 1896

PAVEMENT QUESTION

A special meeting of Ardrossan Commissioners was held last night to consider the pavement question.

Provost Young, who presided, moved the following resolution:-

“Resolved, to proceed as soon as practicable with the repair of all pavements the owners of which have not yet put them in order or undertaken to do so.”

Mr. Boyd seconded the motion.

Mr. Kirkhope moved an amendment proposing to submit a joint case for opinion of counsel as to whether proprietors who have no kerb at their pavement are bound to lay one, and to abide by the opinion obtained.

Bailie Barrie seconded.

After discussion, 3 voted for the amendment and 5 for the motion. Mr. Bennett did not vote.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by down south » Tue Nov 26, 2019 3:52 pm

26th NOVEMBER 1971

ACCIES ARE FIFTY YEARS OLD

Ardrossan Academicals Rugby Club played their first home game fifty years ago this week, and ever since have been recognised as one of the leading clubs in the West of Scotland.

Scorer of the first-ever try for the club in their opening game against Old Spierians was Dr Alex Arnott who now lives in West Kilbride and recalls that the club first played on a field at Crawford Lodge, Ardrossan.

The club was inaugurated as Ardrossan Academicals Sports Club in September 1921, and Dr Arnott said that only five members had ever played rugby before; the other members of the team were soccer players and played the game more like football, dribbling the ball closely - a practice absolutely new in Scottish Rugby Union.

It was noteworthy that the club were unbeaten in their first full season.

Perhaps because of his profession, one game that stands out in Dr Arnott's memory is of " a famous day at Lenzie - we had the ambulance out three times ; even the linesman got his leg broken ! "

Ardrossan and Saltcoats Herald, 26th November 1971


You can read more about the history of the Accies here :

http://www.ardacad.co.uk/arc/accies/accies.shtml

Susan
Last edited by down south on Wed Nov 27, 2019 4:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Wed Nov 27, 2019 8:24 am

GLASGOW HERALD
27 NOVEMBER 1873

FOR SALE BY PUBLIC AUCTION

As she now lies at Ardrossan - the barque HARVEST HOME, of Ardrossan, sale to commence at one o’clock p.m. on Thursday, 18 December.

For particulars apply to William McJannet, Ardrossan.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Wed Nov 27, 2019 8:26 am

GLASGOW HERALD
27 NOVEMBER 1896

IMPORTANT SHIPPING CASE – ANDREASEN v. SHIELDS & BROWN

In this case, which was recently heard by Sheriff Strachan, at Glasgow Sheriff Court, the pursuer’s vessel loaded a cargo of Lanarkshire coals at Ardrossan, and paid the harbour dues on the cargo. The owner of the vessel then sued the defenders, the shippers of the coal, for repayment, averring that the dues were payable by them; the defenders, on the other hand, averred that they were not, and that according to the custom of the port of Ardrossan the ship always paid the dues.

The Sheriff has now decided the question in favour of the ship.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Wed Nov 27, 2019 8:28 am

GLASGOW HERALD
27 NOVEMBER 1914

WAR CASUALTY – NOTE ON OFFICER

Second Lieutenant JAMES A. CHRYSTIE, of the 3rd Battalion (Special Reserve) Royal Scots Fusiliers, who is reported among the missing, is the only son of Provost Chrystie, of Ardrossan. He joined the R.S.F. last November, and prior to that had been an officer in the Ardrossan Academy Cadet Corps. When he went to Glasgow he joined the Officer Training Corps, in which he latterly filled the rank of Captain. He was in his last year for the medical degree at Glasgow University, and was within a few days of sitting his final examinations when called up.

[The late Geomacintyre previously posted this additional information: -

“Second Lieutenant Chrystie was member of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF), “The Old Contemptibles”, he entered the theatre of war on October 6, 1914, and was awarded the 1914 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal.

In March 2008, his British War Medal came up for auction with a guide price of £80 to £100. Sold with copied papers and other research, it fetched £260.

The footnote in the auction catalogue read:

James Alexander Chrystie was born on 30 May 1888 and lived at 18 South Crescent, Ardrossan, Scotland. His parents were James Brown and Elma Eliva Chrystie. He was educated at the Ardrossan Academy and Glasgow University. He was a member of the Ardrossan School Cadet Corps, which was affiliated to the 1st Volunteer Battalion Royal Garrison Artillery.

In 1907, he was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in the 1st V. B. Royal Garrison Artillery and was promoted to Captain in 1908. On 19 November 1913, he was commissioned as a Special Reserve Officer in the 3rd Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers.

By September 1914 he had passed the Matriculation Examination to gain entry to Glasgow University and was in his fifth year of Medical Training. He was immediately “called up” and was attached to the 2nd Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers.

The 2nd Battalion had returned from Gibraltar in 1914 and were quickly sent to Flanders in October 1914 to join the “Contemptible Little Army”. They were part of 21 Brigade, 7th Division and took a major part in the heroic defence of Gheluvelt during the First Battle of Ypres. At this battle, “The 2nd RSF were reduced to a mere handful of men commanded by a subaltern, but held their place in the Line”. During this period Lieutenant Chrystie came to notice by utilising his medical skills to bandage wounded soldiers. His Adjutant, later wrote, ‘This skill saved many lives’.

At 6am on 28 October 1914, Lieutenant Chrystie was sent out in command of a patrol to make contact with the battalion on their right flank near Gorndvoorde, five miles East of Ypres. He returned from this patrol and at 9am set out again with a second patrol with the same mission.

In the patrol, Privates Hill and Douglas acted as ‘point’ followed by Lieutenant Chrystie. Following Chrystie were Corporal Richardson and three other soldiers of the 2nd Battalion including Private Harman (sic). As they moved forward they met, and joined with, a patrol of a corporal and three soldiers from the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Suddenly, according to Private Hardman (sic), they “got into a trap” and Lieutenant Chrystie, the two soldiers on “point” and the four soldiers from the Royal Warwickshire Regiment were taken prisoner. Private Hardman hid in a ruined church but saw that Lieutenant Chrystie was unwounded but standing up with his revolver in his hand. He then saw Chrystie and the six soldiers being marched away as prisoners.

On their return to the Battalion, Corporal Richardson and Privates Elliot and Hardman reported the incident to Sergeant J. McBain and their Company Commander, Captain J. C. Whigram. Captain Whigram initially thought that James Chrystie had either ‘been hit’ or had become separated from his patrol and had stayed with the Household Cavalry who were in the area. He did however send out a patrol to look for Lieutenant Chrystie and his soldiers, but this was unsuccessful. On 30 October 1914 Chrystie was officially reported as ‘Missing 28th October 10am while on patrol taken prisoner unwounded with 6 men’.

The parents of Lieutenant Chrystie then made strenuous efforts to discover the whereabouts of their son. His Mother first met Captain Whigram in London, then his Father, Mr James Brown Chrystie, who was now Provost of Ardrossan, met Captain Whigram in Greenock.

Captain Whigram consistently stated that when he interviewed the remaining soldiers of Chrystie's patrol, they all said that Chrystie had been unwounded when he was captured. Provost Chrystie then contacted Sergeant McBain who wrote that Private Elliot had no doubt that Chrystie was captured without being wounded and was standing untouched in any way.

Provost Chrystie then interviewed Private Hardman, who had subsequently been wounded, who also confirmed that Mr Chrystie was unwounded and had been made a prisoner with the six other soldiers. The Army then officially interviewed Private Hardman and on 7 March 1915 a Captain Stanton wrote to Provost Chrystie confirming that the evidence all pointed to the conclusion that Mr Chrystie was unwounded when he had been marched away as a prisoner.

On 5 August 1915, Provost Chrystie wrote to the Military Secretary asking for information as to whether his son was a prisoner of war or killed. The American Authorities in Berlin passed this request to the German Government who on 30 September 1915 sent a “Note Verbale”, which stated that at the beginning of March 1915 while deepening the bed of the road from Tenbrieler to Zandvoosde, the body of an English soldier had been found by a working party. The body had been reburied due west of the road, but apart from an identification disc - Chrystie J.A. 21 Pres. RSF - nothing further was found on the body.

On 14 December 1915, Provost Chrystie was informed by the War Office that as the identity disc of his son had been forwarded by the German Government through the American Embassy “the death of 2/Lieut. Chrystie has now been accepted for official purposes as having occurred on or since 30th October 1914, the date he was reported missing”.

James Alexander Chrystie's body was not recovered and his name is on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial. His name is also on the Ardrossan Academy Roll of Honour that is sited in the Assembly Hall, and is on the Roll of Honour of Glasgow University and the Town War Memorial of Ardrossan.”]
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Thu Nov 28, 2019 8:06 am

GLASGOW HERALD
28 NOVEMBER 1892

MARRIAGE

BAXTER – STIRLING: At Ardrossan, on the 24th instant, by the Rev. R. Steel, Galston, uncle of the bride, Alexander Baxter, of Baxter brothers, wholesale stationers, Greenock, to Janet Henry, daughter of the late Captain Archibald Stirling, Ardrossan.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Fri Nov 29, 2019 8:30 am

GLASGOW HERALD
29 NOVEMBER 1847

ARDROSSAN COURSING CLUB

The Club held its November meeting on the 24th, 25th, 26th and 27th instant.

The great number of spectators which attended the field day after day, spite of the boisterous and uninviting state of the weather, proves the popularity of the sport, and increases the regret that it should have become a fashion of late, for the Knights of the Leash to break up their kennels, and so cease to take part in contributing to the rural enjoyment, or, if you will, protecting the field pleasures of the sons of native industry.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sat Nov 30, 2019 1:38 pm

GLASGOW HERALD
30 NOVEMBER 1897

SEVERE GALE

On Sunday a severe gale was experienced at Troon.

In the early hours of the morning a strong westerly wind blew, which increased to a gale about 7 a.m. and continued throughout the day, accompanied by heavy showers of rain and sleet.

About 10 o’clock a heavy shower fell, and the wind veered round to the north-west. At this time the look-out at the harbour observed a loaded vessel heading up the Clyde between Troon and Whiting Bay.

The tug TITCHFIELD at once proceeded to the vessel’s assistance in a nasty, lumpy seas, and successfully towed her to Troon Harbour.

She proved to be the American barquentine JAMES H. HAMLEN (Captain S. C. Oakes), bound from Portland, Maine, to Ardrossan, with spoolwood and deals.

The steamer BESSBROOK, which trades between Newry and Ardrossan, had unsuccessfully endeavoured to get hold of the vessel.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sat Nov 30, 2019 1:38 pm

GLASGOW HERALD
30 NOVEMBER 1894

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH

Messrs J. & W. Guthrie have completed the erection of a memorial window in St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Ardrossan. The subject is the crucifixion. Mr. Harrington Mann is the designer. Both in design and execution the window is a very fine piece of workmanship.

It is erected in memory of FRANCES CLEUGH, who died in Ardrossan on 25th May last, and will be dedicated on Sunday morning at the normal forenoon service, when the Bishop of Glasgow will preach.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sun Dec 01, 2019 8:05 am

GLASGOW HERALD
1 DECEMBER 1873

SHIPPING CASUALTY

Tobermory, November 29 – A brigantine of about 300 tons, for Ardrossan (limestone and wood), is reported safely moored at Loch Kintra, on the N.E. side of Ardnamurchan, with loss of rails, having been driven from the coast of Ireland.
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Re: Ardrossan - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sun Dec 01, 2019 8:06 am

GLASGOW HERALD
1 DECEMBER 1873

VESSELS ASHORE

The CONQUEROR and a Welsh schooner, noticed in our impression of Friday as having gone ashore behind Ardrossan breakwater, were towed off on Friday night and taken into the harbour, having seemingly suffered little damage.
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