Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Published stories from each town's past.
Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 14102
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Thu Mar 19, 2020 9:05 am

GLASGOW HERALD
19 MARCH 1900

FOOTBALL
SALTCOATS VICTORIA v. WEST KILBRIDE ATHLETIC
At Saltcoats


Result: - Athletic, 3; Victoria, 1.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 14102
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Thu Mar 19, 2020 9:06 am

GLASGOW HERALD
19 MARCH 1900

ST. PATRICK’S DAY - SALTCOATS

A concert was held in the League of the Cross Hall, where a large and enthusiastic audience attended.

Rev. Father Ryan presided.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 14102
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Thu Mar 19, 2020 9:07 am

GLASGOW HERALD
19 MARCH 1904

COURT OF SESSION – DIVORCE

Lord Kincairney heard evidence in an action of divorce by CATHERINE AGNES WALLACE DAVIDSON or FULTON, Saltcoats, against her husband, Doctor WILLIAM FULTON, whose last known address was Beechgrove, Kilbirnie.

The pursuer, (30), said she was married to the defender on 31st March, 1896.

After the marriage they went to reside in Stevenston, Ayrshire. Doctor Fulton at one time assisted her uncle, Doctor Wallace, who had a practice in Saltcoats and surrounding district.

After the marriage her husband practiced on his own account in Stevenston. They resided there until September, 1902. One child was born of the marriage.

Some months after the marriage the defender became cruel to her. On occasions he took her by the throat, shook her, and struck her, and frequently threatened to kill her. She had known herself to be under the influence of drugs which could have been administered by no one but her husband.

In September, 1898, the defender gave up his practice in Stevenston, and witness went with him to London.

In between times witness was residing with her child in the defender’s father’s house at Kilbirnie but had to leave him on account of his cruelty, and had not seen him since.

In consequence of the treatment she had received she wished proceedings taken to obtain judicial separation and aliment, and instructed her agents to make inquiries.

In the course of these inquiries information was communicated to her which caused her to bring this action.

In between times witness had in her employment as a servant a girl named Chree. After the girl had been a few weeks in the house the defender ordered the witness to go to the island of Arran. During the time she was away the girl was in the house alone with Doctor Fulton. When the witness came home the girl complained of being ill, and cried, saying that she was going to die. For a long time after that witness knew the girl was getting medicine from the defender. Witness had no suspicion then that there was any immoral relations between her husband and Chree.

Between May, 1900, and September, 1902, witness had a domestic servant named Walker.

In May 1902, witness was ill, and her husband told her to go to Arran. While she was away Walker was alone in the house with Doctor Fulton at Stevenston. The child took ill, and witness had to leave Arran hurriedly. Her luggage was left behind. When she told her husband he said he and Walker would go to Arran for the luggage, and, though witness protested against the proposal, they went together.

It is only since the present proceedings were brought that witness knew that her husband had been unfaithful.

Further evidence proved that the defender and Walker had committed adultery.

Lord Kincairney granted decree of divorce, found the pursuer entitled to the custody of the child, and decerned against the defender for payment of £40 a year in name of aliment.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 14102
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Fri Mar 20, 2020 9:09 am

GLASGOW HERALD
20 MARCH 1873

THE PROPOSED CONVALESCENT HOME AT SALTCOATS

The ordinary half-yearly meeting of the Glasgow & South-Western Railway Company was held yesterday, in the hall of the Chamber of Commerce, Glasgow – Sir James Lumsden presiding.

Mr. George Smith called attention to a matter of importance which had appeared in the newspapers, and which it became the board of directors to give a decision upon – viz., with reference to the Fever Home proposed to be established at Saltcoats.

It was a matter which affected the board very considerably, because if they were to carry down fever patients to Saltcoats by the ordinary trains, it would have the effect of preventing parties going down there.

It also affected Saltcoats very seriously, and all those people in Glasgow who wished to go down there for their coast residence.

The board ought therefore, he thought, to inform the public what their intention was with reference to the matter. Either they must have separate carriages to convey the patients to Saltcoats, or they must allow them to come by the general conveyances.

If they were allowed to come by the general conveyances, it would affect the revenue very considerably, while at the same time an injustice would be done to the whole neighbourhood.

It would not be justice to the Infirmary to allow them to come forward with a measure of that kind, seeing the directors might, in a short time, find it necessary to stop conveying patients to the Home at Saltcoats. His impression was that a Convalescent Home ought to be at a convenient distance from the Infirmary, and patients suffering from infectious disease should be removed in private, and not in public conveyances. But in the case of the proposal to establish a home at Saltcoats, it was evident that it was contemplated to make use of the company’s carriages in the conveyance of the patients.

The Chairman said no application had been made to the company by the managers of the Infirmary. They had received no application whatever on the subject, but when application was made the directors would be prepared to consider the matter, and to say what course should be adopted.

He had no doubt they would be able to make some arrangement which would be perfectly satisfactory; and from what had already taken place, it was quite possible that some steps might be taken by which the difficulty could be overcome.

Mr. Clouston explained that the Infirmary managers had no desire to press themselves, however much they desired such a place as that at Saltcoats for fever patients – they did not wish to go against the public voice in any respect.

They would be glad to receive any communication or representation from the people connected with or interested in Saltcoats, and he was satisfied they would get fair consideration.

The meeting then separated.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 14102
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Fri Mar 20, 2020 9:10 am

GLASGOW HERALD
20 MARCH 1873

Sir,

PROPOSED CONVALESCENT HOME AT SALTCOATS

Perhaps you will permit me, through your columns, to make a remark or two on a letter published in your paper today (18 March), signed by the Rev. David E. McNab, Ardrossan Manse, Saltcoats.

It is difficult to know what other motive the reverend gentleman could have in penning such an epistle than to pour a little more of that indignation, whether righteous or unrighteous, which has been so freely spent of late on the devoted head of your humble servant and one or two others, whose material interests in the prosperity of the town are second to none in it, in connection with the proposed Home.

Would it not have been more in accordance with his profession as a minister of the gospel if, instead of going about inflaming the public mind, proclaiming wrath and indignation against the heads of those who have never shown themselves backward in any good work tending to benefit the town, he had gone among those for whom he professes the greatest pity, and said to them though their fears were great that the placing of such an institution here might be hurtful to them, still an overruling Providence might turn a feared evil into a future good, and their fears might yet be disappointed.

A good deal might be said to disabuse the people of their very strong prejudice in this matter, but in the present state of public feeling it is needless, reason appears to have fled, and strong assertion taken its place.

I don’t think those connected with this transaction have the least reason to be ashamed either of their conduct or motives with regards to this matter, however much they may and do deplore the public excitement; but what is to be said for those who would do and have done their utmost to ruin the business and profession of a man who has always shown himself as one of the most worthy of the community?

“There are those who speak with tongues, and have not charity.”

I am &c.,
WILLIAM AITKEN,
Eglinton Place,
Saltcoats.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 14102
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Fri Mar 20, 2020 9:11 am

GLASGOW HERALD
20 MARCH 1888

DEATH

CUNNINGHAM: At 41 Hamilton Street, Saltcoats, on the 17th instant, Margaret Glen Cunningham, of 115 Titchfield Street, Kilmarnock.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 14102
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sat Mar 21, 2020 10:39 am

GLASGOW HERALD
21 MARCH 1903

DEATH

McKINNON: At 7 Melbourne Terrace, Saltcoats (the residence of her niece, Mrs. Hamilton), on the 20th instant, Ann McKinnon, in her 95th year.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 14102
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sat Mar 21, 2020 10:40 am

GLASGOW HERALD
21 MARCH 1904

DEATH

McINTYRE: Suddenly, at 9 Hill Street, Saltcoats, on the 19th instant, Jeanie McIntyre wife of Alexander McIntyre, joiner.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 14102
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Sun Mar 22, 2020 10:02 am

GLASGOW HERALD
22 MARCH 1900

DEATH

DUNLOP: At 64 Hamilton Street, Saltcoats, on the 20th instant, Ann Stirrat, relict of Robert Dunlop, Corsehill Farm, Dreghorn.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 14102
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Mon Mar 23, 2020 9:07 am

GLASGOW HERALD
23 MARCH 1867

MARRIAGE

At Melbourne Terrace, Saltcoats, on the 21st instant, by the Rev. D. MacNab, Mr. William Brand, Woodburn Terrace, Glasgow, to Margaret Dunlop, eldest daughter of the late Mr. J. M. Dunlop, of Jamaica.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 14102
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Tue Mar 24, 2020 9:30 am

GLASGOW HERALD
24 MARCH 1875

DEATH

At 65 Hamilton Street, Saltcoats, on the 22nd instant, Captain Hugh Wylie, senior, 66 years.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Penny Tray
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 14102
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 2:46 pm

Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Tue Mar 24, 2020 9:32 am

GLASGOW HERALD
24 MARCH 1905

DEATH

CAMPBELL: AT Parkhouse, Matakana, Auckland, New Zealand, on the 26th of January, Alexander Campbell, J.P., in his 72nd year; a native of Saltcoats.
Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it.

Post Reply