Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Published stories from each town's past.
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Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Mon Mar 16, 2020 8:28 am

GLASGOW HERALD
16 MARCH 1900

DEATH

PARSONSON: Suddenly, at Craigievar Cottage, Saltcoats, on the 14th instant, the Rev. John Enoch Parsonson, Wesleyan Methodist minister, late of Cradock, Cape Colony.

DEATH OF REV. J. E. PARSONSON

The Rev. John Enoch Parsonson, Wesleyan minister, late of Cradock, Cape Colony, died suddenly in Saltcoats last night (14th March).

Mr. Parsinson came from the Cape last summer on the usual furlough of a year after 25 years’ ministry; and had been residing in Saltcoats for the past three months where he officiated in several of the churches.

He was in his usual health on Tuesday, but was seized with spasms of the heart on Wednesday, and died suddenly that night.

He has left a widow and two daughters, who were with him in Saltcoats, one son in Bulawayo, and two sons and one daughter at school in the colony.
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Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Mon Mar 16, 2020 8:30 am

GLASGOW HERALD
16 MARCH 1904

NEW ROADWAY

At a meeting of Saltcoats Town Council – Provost Guthrie presiding – assignations of leasehold subjects in Canal Street and ground in Rocky Park from James McIsaac, with consent of trustees of the late Mr. James McIsaac, of Parkend, to the Council, were signed and sealed.

Plans and estimates of the cost of constructing a new roadway from Gladstone Road to Canal Street sewer, and wall to be built to divide the ground acquired by the Council from the remainder of Parkend, were submitted, and the Roads Committee were authorised to carry out the work, either by contract, or by workmen under the control of the burgh surveyor.

The roadway, when completed, will be a great improvement, shortening the distance to Stevenston from certain parts of the town by nearly half a mile.
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Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Mon Mar 16, 2020 8:31 am

GLASGOW HERALD
16 MARCH 1905

STORM – TRAINS DRENCHED WITH SEA WATER

Saltcoats:
At the East Bay a heavy sea was running, and the spray from the waves was carried right over the Glasgow & South-Western Railway. Between five and six o’clock, when the sea was at its height, passenger trains received a drenching of sea water. It was thought some damage would be done to the breakwater, and railway workers were on the ground ready to make any needful repairs.

Some fears were entertained for the new iron footbridge, but it was uninjured.

At the harbour there was not much damage done.
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Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Mon Mar 16, 2020 8:32 am

GLASGOW HERALD
16 MARCH 1908

MARRIAGE

STIRRAT – RITCHIE: At St. Andrew’s Church, Colombo, Ceylon, on Saturday, 14th instant, by the Rev. Alexander Dunn, M.A., Robert Stirrat, of Saltcoats, to Mary Hogg, eldest daughter of William Ritchie, Esquire, Biggarford, Newlands.
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Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Mon Mar 16, 2020 8:32 am

GLASGOW HERALD
16 MARCH 1909

DEATH

BROWN: At St. Elmo, Argyle Road, Saltcoats, on the 14th instant, Mary Reid, aged 78 years, relict of John Brown, farmer, Sheddock, Arran.
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Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Tue Mar 17, 2020 9:05 am

GLASGOW HERALD
17 MARCH 1904

MARRIAGE

DALGLIESH – PATON: At the house of the bridegroom’s brother-in-law, Monkcastle Drive, Cambuslang, on March 16, by the Rev. a Middleton, West Establish Church, Walter, youngest son of Walter Dalgliesh, Levernholme Lodge, Hurlet, to Augusta Chads Dunlop, youngest daughter of Robert Paton, watchmaker, Saltcoats.
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Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Tue Mar 17, 2020 9:06 am

GLASGOW HERALD
17 MARCH 1904

DEATH

KINNIER: At 66 Hamilton Street, Saltcoats, on the 16th instant, Doctor R. S. Kinnier, aged 77 years.

OBITUARY

Doctor R. S. KINNIER, the oldest medical man in Saltcoats, died yesterday afternoon.

He was widely known and respected. A native of Saltcoats, he had a most extensive practice there, and was popular with all classes. To the poor he proved a real friend, and by this class he will be greatly missed, as they benefited by the assistance he rendered them.

Amid his busy professional duties he found time to do a good deal of public work. He was returned at the top of the poll at the first burgh election, and was afterwards elected a Bailie, serving for a term. In the Northern District of the County Council he represented Saltcoats for some years. As a Justice of the Peace he took a good share in the duties of the local courts. He was an elder in the Landsborough United Free Church for many years. With all charitable work Doctor Kinnier was in entire sympathy, giving his help readily and freely.

His fellow citizens were not slow to recognise his worth, and on two occasions he received public testimonials. One of these was on attaining his jubilee as a medical man. He was then at a public meeting presented with a cheque and a piece of silver plate. The subscribers to this testimonial were numerous, and included some of the poorer citizens, who in this way showed their respect for him.
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Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Tue Mar 17, 2020 9:07 am

GLASGOW HERALD
17 MARCH 1905

SALTCOATS TOWN COUNCIL AND FACTORY HOLIDAYS

At a meeting of Saltcoats Town Council, Provost Blakely moved the suspension of the standing orders so that the factory holidays fixed at a previous meeting of the Council to be on Wednesday in April and September and observed by the merchants as holidays, might be altered giving a choice of either Mondays or Wednesdays.

The suspension was agreed to and the Provost moved accordingly.

He pointed out that holidays on Wednesdays were unsuitable to a great many trades, and it would be more advantageous if the holidays could be on either Monday or Wednesday.

Councillor McKirdy objected to the Mondays because the employees would not get the benefit of the cheap excursions arranged for on Wednesdays. He moved that the dates fixed be adhered to.

There was no seconder to the amendment, and the Provost’s motion was agreed to.
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Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Tue Mar 17, 2020 9:08 am

CASUALTY OF WAR
17 MARCH 1915

Died in service, Chief Stoker ROBERT SMITH, H.M.S. INDEFATIGABLE – Theatre of war, home – son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Smith, Thomas Campbell Street, Saltcoats.

The Ardrossan & Saltcoats Herald subsequently reported: -

Information was received in Saltcoats yesterday of the death of Robert Smith, chief stoker on board H.M.S. INDEFATIGABLE.

Mr. Smith was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Smith, who at present reside at Thomas Campbell Street. He joined the navy about 22 years ago, and had just about completed his time. He was in the North Sea with his vessel when he contracted a chill which developed into pneumonia. He was landed at the Naval Hospital at South Queensferry, and died there on Wednesday.

Mr. Smith, who was about 39 years of age, was unmarried. He was a splendid specimen of a British Tar.
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Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Wed Mar 18, 2020 9:13 am

GLASGOW HERALD
18 MARCH 1873

Sir,

PROPOSED CONVALESCENT FEVER HOME AT SALTCOATS

Will you allow me to state in a few sentences, through your columns, the reasons why we view with so much anxiety the proposal by the Royal Infirmary of Glasgow to establish in Saltcoats a Convalescent Home for fever patients?

Before doing so, however, I ought to state that, when the proposal came, it took all of us who are interested in the welfare of the town very much by surprise. A few weeks since, the proprietor of the Saracen’s Head Hotel, here, let it be known that he was in terms with the directors of the Royal Infirmary of Glasgow for its sale, with a view to it being converted into a Convalescent Home for fever patients.

He immediately discovered that it was a proposal which would never be tolerated by the community, and so at once withdrew from these negotiations, disposing of the property to another party altogether, who, he told us, would on no account apply it to the purpose he had himself in contemplation.

Nothing more was heard of the affair until, a fortnight after, we were informed that the party who had acquired the property, a gentleman well known in Saltcoats, had effected a sale with the Royal Infirmary, and that the property was already “irrevocably” out of his hands.

I mention this, as many of our friends have expressed their astonishment that the inhabitants of Saltcoats would have allowed the proposal to go even so far as it has done. Had the slightest hint been given them that the proposal was again in contemplation there is no doubt that means would at once have been adopted which would have averted the calamity.

We feel aggrieved that the directors of the Infirmary should propose to inflict their fever patients on a community so far removed from them.

We believe and we have good grounds for believing, that there is not a little danger in connection with these patients, even when they are in the stage of convalescence, and we think that it is just a little too much that the directors of this excellent institution should come all the way to this quiet seaport town, and without even saying “With your leave?” thrust their patients at that stage of the danger upon us.

We are always glad to welcome to our shores such invalids as have been want to visit us in search of that health and vigour which our bracing atmosphere is so well calculated to give, and just because we would preserve the locality as a safe retreat for these, we must protect against the establishment of an institution among us by persons who have otherwise no interest in the locality, which will be a constant source of anxiety and alarm.

Nor is it, Sir, the prospect of a fever hospital being permanently established here that alarms us; it is, moreover, the place which has been selected for the purpose. Perhaps along the whole coast for twenty miles on either side of it would it be impossible to find a site for such a purpose so badly placed.

We are at a loss to know what the directors of the Royal Infirmary could have seen in the Saracen’s Head Hotel to introduce them to purchase it for a convalescent fever home – except, indeed, it be the cheapness; and they would certainly never have got it so cheap if the locality not been a thoroughly bad one. The houses in the immediate neighbourhood are, for the most part, the worst in the town, inhabited by the poorest. If there is a fever in Saltcoats, it is sure to be there.

The hotel buildings lie low; they are a considerable way off from the railway station; and the access to them is by narrow lanes. All our medical practitioners pronounce the place totally unsuitable, and assert with the utmost confidence, that no man who is an authority on fever, or who has had to deal with it in a practical form, could do otherwise than condemn it.

We do dread a home for fever patients being planted in such a locality as that.

Supposing it is true, that there is no danger with such patients when in a convalescent state, what guarantee have we that no one, even by an oversight, at a stage when the disease is contagious, will be sent down?

Is it too much to presume that were there a pressure on the Infirmary in a time of epidemic, they might possibly now and again not be very particular about the patients they send off to the distant seaside home?

Are there not some forms of fever that are subject to relapse? And what is to prevent the Convalescent Home, when such cases occur, to be turned literally into a fever ward? Were it to be so, there is no locality in the whole town where the evil would be so readily caught up and diffused through the district around.

We are aware, of course, that some doctors pooh, pooh the idea of contagion altogether; but you know that others don’t; and when doctors differ, what are the ignorant to do? They will necessarily believe the worst, and will not that very fear prepare the way for the charge they desire to shun?

We feel, Sir, if this scheme is carried into effect, that it will be the ruin of all the important interests of this place. We have no public works. We have no shipping. We depend almost wholly on the preservation of Saltcoats as a watering place, and in that character we have been pleased to find that every year, more especially of late, it has been growing in importance; but if this scheme goes on, its days are assuredly numbered.

Who in search of health or recreation would come to a place with a fever ward of the Glasgow Infirmary in its centre? Already we have heard of those who were want to visit us who have intimated that, with this threatened Home before them, they will be obliged to seek summer quarters in some other place where no such dangers exists.

All will suffer; but the class I pity most are the persons – most of them widows – who have invested all their little capital in houses in which they have furnished for summer visitors, and who, therefore, are dependent on the letting of them for their living. They will be left almost destitute. I know of those who, if their houses are unlet but for one season – as in the coming season they threaten to be – will suffer great privation indeed.

Is it too much; in view of such facts as these, to ask the directors to reconsider their decision. Let them not say that our anxiety is mere temporary excitement, and that it will soon blow by. It is not so. We are thoroughly in earnest. We feel that a deep injustice is being done to an un-offending community, and we cannot submit to it. We do not, however, lay the blame altogether at the door of the directors of the Infirmary. We have more cause to spend our indignation on the persons at home, who, for their own interests, tempted them hither. But we do most respectfully, but at the same time most earnestly, solicit the directors to abandon their purpose; and believing as we do that they are all of them gentlemen of generous hearts and open to reason, and that they could never insist on doing to us what I am sure they would not like done to themselves, we shall cherish the hope that they will yet see their way to accept our request.

I am &c.,
David E. McNab,
Manse of Ardrossan,
Saltcoats.
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Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Penny Tray » Wed Mar 18, 2020 9:14 am

GLASGOW HERALD
18 MARCH 1903

MARRIAGE

LANG – LEGG: At Carrick House, Saltcoats, on the 17th instant, by the Rev. W. D. M. Sutherland, Thomas M. Lang, to Janet Martin, youngest daughter of the late William M. Legg.
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Re: Saltcoats - On This Day In History

Post by Hughie » Thu Mar 19, 2020 12:04 am

The Scotsman
19 March 1825

EXTENSIVE GOING COAL AND SALTWORKS TO BE LET,


The Stevenston Coliery and Saltworks, with the whole machinery and utensils belonging thereto, as at present possessed by Messrs Warner and Cunninghame, the proprietors, for such a length of time as may be agreed on.
The coal, of which there are several seams, is of a superior quality, and there are at present four output pits. The local situation of the coal field is very eligible for disposing of the coal for export to Dublin and other places in Ireland, where there is always a regular demand, and also to the River Clyde, for home consumpt.

The most distant going pit in the field is only about two miles from Saltcoats harbour ; there is a good railway to Saltcoats, from which the harbour of Ardrossan! is only about two miles distant.
The Saltworks adjoin the harbour of Saltcoats, and have an ample supply of salt water, producing salt of the best quality, and made at a moderate expense.

Offers in writing, on or before the 12th April first, will be received by Robert Cunninghame, Esq. of Auchenharvie, at Seabank, near Saltcoats; William Patrick, W.S. Edinburgh; Mr Robert Rankin, senior, writer in Irvine; or. Samuel Croker, Saltcoats : any of whom will give directions for showing the works to intending offerers.

Coaliery Office. Saltcoats. 12th March 1825.

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