Ardrossan Academy: Rector's reports 1958-61, 1967, 1971, 1972

Post about your old school - ask about old school pals
Post Reply
User avatar
down south
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 3183
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 4:18 pm
Location: Cheshire,formerly Saltcoats

Ardrossan Academy: Rector's reports 1958-61, 1967, 1971, 1972

Post by down south » Fri Jul 31, 2020 2:50 pm

These first four Rector's Reports appeared in the School Magazine. Here to start with is the report for session 1957- 1958.

RECTOR'S REPORT - SECONDARY SCHOOL

The opening of the new session was accompanied by the now almost inevitable staff changes. Mr Penman entered on duty as Principal Teacher of Geography, Miss Walls succeeded Miss Crawford in the Department of Mathematics and Mr Whitefield joined the science staff. Part time assistance in gymnastics has been given by Mrs Stewart and Mr Cochrane and in French by Mlle Ropers. Throughout the session staff absences due to illness have been considerable and we were indebted to Mrs Black and Mrs McInnes for temporary service in the primary school. We were also fortunate in having Mrs Cheetham to replace Miss Sinclair on her promotion to Dalry.

Accomodation is still taxed to capacity both in primary and Secondary. The respective tolls were 413 and 789 at the commencement of the school year and an additional Primary class was enrolled in February. The delay in constructing the new laboratory has made it difficult to provide facilities for practical work in science for some of the upper forms and pending its completion this problem will be with us for some time yet.

On the Academic side Leaving Certificate presentations remain at a steady level, 115 candidates being presented. A Shell scholarship has been awarded to Robert Bonnar of Form VI , and Ann Pae , also of Form VI, has gained the Pyper Bursary tenable for four years at St Andrew's University.

The school has been well represented in almost every extra curricular activity. Worthy of mention are the extensive sports fixtures, the Ayrshire Festival, West Linton, the Orchestral Summer School, the conference on international affairs, and the inter-school debates. In the Classical Verse Speaking competition our six representatives gained much commendation and maintained the high standard of previous years. Our various clubs and societies continue to flourish. Their activities are reported in detail elsewhere. During the year pupils have contributed a total of £70 to various funds, including the Bridge of Weir Homes, Save the Children Fund, and the Spastic Children's Fund.

It is perhaps appropriate to mention that 1958 has seen the fulfilment of a long cherished hope on the part of the Former Pupils' Club in the opening of a Pavilion on the playing field. Rising costs have greatly increased the original estimate for the project, but it is most gratifying to know that the continued interest of former pupils, pupils and friends has made it possible. Grateful acknowledgement must be made to the work of Mr Leslie Callan, president of the F P Club, for his untiring efforts in this matter and his enthusiasm sustained in spite of many difficulties. It is worthy of note also that the sum of about £6000 has now been spent in providing sports facilities in the form of the Memorial Fund and its associated schemes and it might well be claimed that when this work and various projects for which the Spring Fair was held are completed the Academy will be equipped with recreational and educational facilities to meet all requirements.

No report of the school year would be complete without reference to two staff changes in particular. Miss Sinclair, who has now entered on duty as Principal Teacher of Modern Languages in Dalry, has given faithful service to the school in many ways since her appointment here in 1938 and our appreciation found appropriate expression in gifts from both staff and pupils. Mr Stratton, who now goes to Stevenston as headmaster, merits special mention for his work not only as Principal Teacher of Mathematics but also as Deputy Rector during the illness of Mr Pennel. In addition to the routine teaching in the classroom Mr Stratton has undertaken a multiplicity of duties all of which have in very appreciable measure contributed to the well-being of the Academy and for which the school is indeed indebted to him. He will be remembered as a Mathematics teacher of the first rank, a competent administrator, and to those on the staff who knew him intimately, as a loyal and sincere friend. To both Miss Sinclair and Mr Stratton we would extend our best wishes for every success in their new spheres.

Finally we acknowledge again the voluntary services given to our school by the Rev T Williamson as chaplain and his associates, the Rev W G Penny and the Rev J Falconer, all of whom have taken the religious instruction periods with upper forms. We sincerely thank the donors of prizes and our school convener, ex-Provost Hogarth, for their continued interest in the school and its pupils.

To conclude on a more personal note I express my most sincere thanks to teaching staff and others associated with me in the work of the school for their endeavours and helpful co-operation during the past session.

( The Rector will make his usual report on the Primary School at the Primary Closing Ceremony. )


Fuller reports on the departures of Miss Sinclair and Mr Stratton can be found on the Ardrossan Academy Archive website.

Susan

User avatar
down south
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 3183
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 4:18 pm
Location: Cheshire,formerly Saltcoats

Re: Ardrossan Academy: Rector's reports 1958-61, 1967, 1971, 1972

Post by down south » Wed Aug 12, 2020 3:41 pm

Here now is the Rector's Report for session 1958-59.

RECTOR'S REPORT - SECONDARY SCHOOL

This session has been one in which staff changes have been considerable and detailed reference to these is made elsewhere in this magazine. I would at this point however recall the retirement of Mr Dick and our pleasure that a measure of good health is now his. We regretted the loss of Mr Jack on his appointment as head teacher in Fairlie but were happy at his promotion and wish him well in his new post. I would express my indebtedness to Mr Scott, Mrs Manson and Mr Rutherford for their assistance during a period when staffing was difficult.

New teachers welcomed either at the opening of the session or in the course of the year were Mr Dempster who followed Mr Stratton as Principal Teacher of Mathematics, Miss Lyle who transferred from our own Primary Department to Secondary, Mr Hinshalwood, Mr Dunlop who replaces Mr MacGillivray ( now in Annan Academy ), Mr Johncock, Mrs Horton and Miss Abercrombie (who succeeded Miss Paterson now in Edinburgh ).

Mr Partridge was appointed to the post of Principal Teacher of History rendered vacant by the death of the late Mr James Murray whose faithful service and great interest in the school will be long remembered by his colleagues and the pupils whom he taught. His pioneering work in rugby is to be commemorated by the James Murray Trophy gifted by the F P Rugby Section to be competed for annually in the rugby seven-a-sides tournament.

It will be obvious from the number of changes that this year has had its difficulties and these have not been made less so by the fact that, until the present summer term, scarcely a week has passed without absence of staff due to illness. Many additional teaching duties have thus fallen to all, but the willing manner in which these were undertaken has enabled the school to run smoothly throughout the session. It would be too much to claim that the instruction has been unaffected, but some satisfaction may be derived from the knowledge that no subject suffered unduly, and no class had to be left without a teacher for any length of time. There is an acute shortage of teachers and staffing difficulties are generally known. It might therefore be appropriate at this point to ask parents to consider the profession of teaching as a possible career for pupils who are of Leaving Certificate calibre. As a profession it may not at present offer the attraction of the highly paid posts of industry but for the person of good intellectual ability with a sense of vocation it can be interesting and rewarding. It should be noted however that for Senior Secondary work an Honours Degree is, in normal circumstances, the usual qualification.

The general pattern of school life remains much the same as in previous years. The number of candidates presented in all subjects in the Leaving Certificate was 152 ( compared with 145 in 1958 ) and for the first time we have presented in the three branches of Additional Mathematics. It is encouraging to note that a considerable number of pupils continue their studies at university and other institutions. In the session now ending, twenty-four hope to qualify for admission to degree courses and sixteen girls intend entering the College of Education for teacher training.

Considerable publicity was given to the report of the Working Party on the IVth Year Certificate. It would appear that its introduction will be postponed until 1962. If so, pupils in the IVth Year then will be the first to have an opportunity of presenting themselves for examination in leaving Certificate subjects on a new Ordinary level. This possibility should be kept in mind by pupils entering the IIIrd Year in 1960-61 and who will therefore be eligible for presentation in the summer term of 1962.

On the recreational side organisations continue to prosper. The alteration to the platform and the installation of grid and curtains provide a well equipped stage for dramatic and concert work, and the appropriate fitting out of a special room will enable a beginning to be made with the establishment of a school reference library. Activities outwith the school are well supported. Pupils are participating in the French Summer School, West Linton, and the Orchestral Summer School. A small but enthusiastic group of classical scholars represented the school at the Classical Verse Speaking Competition gaining three commendations and a first in Greek verse, and our Primary Choir and Secondary Country Dance team competed at the Ayrshire Festival, the Primary Choir gaining the Cloncaird Shield. The interest in sport remains unabated and we are glad to see Mr Hughes able to resume his duties and keep alive the enthusiasm which has always characterised this side of the work. Donations from the school to various deserving causes have amounted to £55.

I again express my indebtedness to our school chaplain, the Rev Tom Williamson, B D , and his colleagues the Rev W G Penny, B D , and the Rev J Falconer ( who has now gone to Aberdeen ), for their work with upper forms. On behalf of the school I would thank the many donors of prizes for their continued generosity and our convener, ex-Provost Beggs, for representing the school on the Education Sub-Committee. In every school there are occasions when assistance is given by senior pupils and to those who have given their services in many directions during the session due acknowledgement is made. I am moreover sensible of the value of effective co-operation on the part of the auxiliary services. I make reference to the work in my office undertaken by my secretary, to that of the janitors and cleaners and to that of the supervisor and Dining Hall helpers. All have contributed in no small measure to the smooth day to day working of the school. But I am especially indebted to the teaching staff whose helpfulness on many occasions has meant much in a session when staffing was difficult and I wish to express my thanks to one and all. On this note I would close. I trust that pupils and staff and others associated with the school will have a health-giving and enjoyable holiday in the months which lie ahead and return refreshed and invigorated when school re-opens on Tuesday , 1st September at 10 am.


Susan

User avatar
down south
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 3183
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 4:18 pm
Location: Cheshire,formerly Saltcoats

Re: Ardrossan Academy: Rector's reports 1958-61, 1967, 1971, 1972

Post by down south » Tue Aug 18, 2020 2:55 pm

Moving on now to the Rector's Report for session 1959-60.

RECTOR'S REPORT

Staff changes have been few in the present session. Mr Godsman, a former Dux of the school, was appointed to the Science department, and Mrs Murray and Mrs McAlpine to give part-time assistance in Gymnastics and Domestic Science respectively. In the course of the session additional assistance in Primary was given by Mrs Young and Mrs Gemmill. The appointment of Mr Brawn to assist on two days means that all classes in Primary are now having instruction in Music. Teaching has thus been possible throughout the session without interruption and all classes have benefited accordingly. The work of the office has been made less onerous by the part-time services of Miss Rowley.

The roll continues at a high level. There were three hundred and ninety-four pupils in Primary and eight hundred and sixty-four in Secondary at the opening of the session. The number of candidates presented in Leaving Certificate subjects was one hundred and sixty-four compared with one hundred and fifty-two last year. It is hoped that about 15 pupils will proceed to University, ten to the Technical College courses, and possibly twelve girls to the College of Education for teacher training.

Much thought has been devoted to the problems associated with the proposal to introduce a certificate at IVth Year level in 1962. Lack of accommodation makes it impossible to implement all the requirements in the present transitional period. It is expected, however, that in session 1961-62 the school organisation will be sufficiently flexible to offer the suggested choice of courses to pupils who will then be entering the IIIrd Year. This certificate is intended primarily for pupils who are at present leaving at the end of the IIIrd Year. In future by remaining for a IVth Year they will be eligible for presentation for the Scottish Certificate of Education, and its award will signify the successful completion of four years of Secondary Education. The degree of difficulty will be comparable to that of the General Certificate of Education in England, which at ordinary level ( "O" level ) does not demand such a high standard of work as the present " Lower " paper in the Leaving Certificate. Without going into reasons, it is advised that able pupils who might be expected to gain a Leaving Certificate in Vth Year should by-pass this IVth Year Certificate. Parents will be given further information on this subject during the course of next session.

On the recreational side, there is no diminution in the number of organisations. Their scope and character is well known. The place taken by organised games and the very full programme of fixtures arranged is always one of the outstanding features of the school year. Mention might be made however of a new venture, the visit of two groups of pupils to Switzerland last Easter, one arranged for the girls, by the school, and the other for the boys, under the auspices of the Scottish Secondary Schools Travel Trust. As usual, pupils will take part in the French Summer School , and the Orchestral Summer School. During the session the Primary choir gained second place at the Festival and a team represented the school in the Country Dance Section.

It is a source of satisfaction that the library has been organised and is now open to staff and pupils. At this initial stage about £120 has been expended on books and many books have been gifted but the number of volumes is still far short of the requirements. Further donations of suitable books will be gratefully acknowledged.

Pupils continue to give generously to deserving causes. Contributions amounted to £135 in the past session of which £80 was subscribed in aid of Refugee Year. The Mile of Pennies in aid of the Memorial Field Improvement Fund brought in £78.

It was with regret that we said goodbye to our school chaplain, the Rev Tom Williamson, BD, who has now entered on a new pastoral charge in Glasgow. Mr Williamson merits our sincere thanks, not only for his services as chaplain but also for his work with Forms IV and V during the last four years. We wish him well in his new sphere. Our thanks are also due to the Rev W G Penny, BD, and the Rev E Lowe, BD, for their labours with upper forms , and to ex-Provost John Beggs, our convener, for the keen interest which he takes in our well-being.

It is inevitable in a short report of this nature that some items are inadvertently omitted, others of necessity for lack of space. Again information connected with examination results or reports on former pupils is not known at the time of going to press. In the case of omissions I would ask that such be included by implication in my thanks to the teaching staff for their labours in the classrooms and for that voluntary assistance without which the extra curricular activities could not be organised. I am aware also of the contribution made to the general well=being of the Academy by my secretary and her assistant, the janitors, cleaners and Dining Hall staff, and I acknowledge the helpful service which one and all have given. again, therefore, as the session draws to a close I extend to everyone my wish that the vacation will bring days of pleasant leisure in which to relax in mind and body, and renewed vigour for the arduous session which lies ahead. School will re-open on 30th August at 10am.


Susan

User avatar
down south
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 3183
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 4:18 pm
Location: Cheshire,formerly Saltcoats

Re: Ardrossan Academy: Rector's reports 1958-61, 1967, 1971, 1972

Post by down south » Wed Aug 26, 2020 3:21 pm

Finally in this set of reports from the school magazine, we come to the report for session 1960-61.

RECTOR'S REPORT

The following report is concerned mainly with items which are not to be found in the Academy Diary nor in the articles from secretaries of various organisations, but which nevertheless merit mention in virtue either of their intrinsic importance or their relevance to the work of the school in the past year.

A high level of enrolment continues. The session opened with a Primary roll of 365 ( augmented to 392 in February ) and a Secondary roll of 873, of whom 397 were in Forms IV-VI. This continues to put a severe strain on accommodation, every available room being in full use throughout each day of the week. The organisation now provides the courses at both " O " and " H " level for the Scottish Certificate of Education and a wide choice is offered to pupils entering Form III. A final decision has been made to retain in its essentials the Fourth Year Intensive Commercial Course. Pupils taking this class will be those who have studied commercial subjects in Form III and who intend leaving school at the end of their fourth year. It will depend on progress and ability in the subjects studied whether they will be eligible for presentation at " O " level in the Scottish Certificate of Education or for the Clerk-Typist and Shorthand-Typist Certificate of the Commercial College. ( An endeavour will be made to give special consideration to pupils joining this section in the fourth year who have not had previous instruction in commercial subjects. )

Some staffing difficulties have arisen, but they have not been serious ; one department only ( Modern Languages ) was affected. As a staff we have always been much concerned that our able pupils should endeavour to earn professional qualifications rather than rest contented with the immediate rewards of employment on leaving school, and we might reasonably claim that the staffing position in this area benefits from this policy. Indeed one-third of the Academy staff are former pupils. In the interests of effective teaching staffing must be related to the size of classes. It is not always realised by parents that it is a very great advantage to pupils if they are taught in a group of 30 rather than a group of 40, quite apart from the additional strain which a large class imposes on a teacher in terms of marking, correction and individual attention. There should, therefore, be concern about recruitment to teaching and the quality of entrants to the profession.

The number of candidates presented over all subjects in the Leaving Certificate examination was 198, an increase of 33 over last year ( 165 ). From 1962 this examination will be held in May and in consequence will change the pattern of the school year. Results will not be issued until August, and pupils in sixth year who fail to gain University entrance will be unable to fall back on the August Preliminary examination which will be discontinued. In its place the University will conduct an examination in January ; even so , a pass gained then will mean that the student cannot commence a University course until the following October. he would, therefore, lose a year.

Competition for admission to Form III from Largs and Stevenston is keen and places are again limited. This position should improve from 1962 onwards, by which time the present overlap in recruitment in Form III and IV will right itself. Lack of accommodation is also affecting the Primary department. There will be no Infant Beginners' Class in February 1962. Pupils in the priority area who would be enrolling then will be accepted in September if the parent so desires.

It is with regret that, at the end of this session, we shall lose the services of two of our members, Miss Francis and Mrs Horton. Miss Francis has served in this school for twenty-six years and I use the word in its widest sense, for there is scarcely an activity in which she has not participated either directly or indirectly. Meticulous to a degree in her class teaching, and gracious in her response to every request made of her, she exemplified all tbese qualities which made teaching a vocation and now that she has decided to retire we wish her continued good health and many years of well-earned leisure.

We shall also miss Mrs Horton. She came as a much-needed help in time of acute staffing shortage, but we knew we could not keep her permanently, and now that she has decided to devote her energies to her home we can but express our indebtedness to her not only for her work in the classroom but for the very real interest which she has taken in all the activities of her old school.

Leaving Certificate supervision becomes more exacting every year, and we are fortunate in the team of Supervisors under the direction of Mr Dawes who assist us on these occasions. Although they are responsible to the Department I should like to thank them for their endeavours in this connection and for the punctilious manner in which they undertake their duties.

We also thank ex-Provost Beggs, our Convener,for his continued interest in all that affects the well-being of the Academy, and our new Chaplain, the Rev James Ewing, BD , for taking our services during the session.

I end on a personal note. It is possibly very true to say that only the Headmaster knows of all the activities which are undertaken in a large school, whether they be regular or incidental, whether curricular or extra-curricular. For the work thus undertaken by my staff I express my appreciation. I know full well that the contribution which is made cannot be measured solely in terms of results, nor is it always immediately apparent. I would, therefore, express my thanks to one and all whether concerned primarily with the pupils or associated with the school in other ways, and I trust that for everyone the forthcoming holiday will be one of interest, relaxation and pleasure, a welcome interlude between now and the new session.


Susan

User avatar
down south
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 3183
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 4:18 pm
Location: Cheshire,formerly Saltcoats

Re: Ardrossan Academy: Rector's reports 1958-61, 1967, 1971, 1972

Post by down south » Thu Sep 03, 2020 3:19 pm

Here now is the Rector's report for 1966-67, given at the prizegiving, which appeared in the Ardrossan and Saltcoats Herald.

STAFF SHORTAGE WORRIES RECTOR
" WE ARE ALL PERTURBED "

That " the number of men and women entering the teaching profession is totally inadequate to cope with the proposed raising of the school leaving age in 1970 " was stated by Mr D Macfarlane , Rector of Ardrossan Academy, when he gave his annual report at the school's closing ceremony on Wednesday of last week.

" We, in the profession , know this , " said Mr Macfarlane. " But it is a fact which is not being faced by the Government. All who have the interests of education at heart should become really concerned, to the extent of personal contact with their local education representatives and , indeed, their MPs.

" The position is serious. I urge you to become involved at both local and Government level. This is a national crisis which may come to a head much sooner than we expect. We are all perturbed. I can assure you of that."

Mr Macfarlane said that the " tremendous swing " away from mathematics and science had been noted "with great concern " by senior secondary headmasters who had, during the past session, been meeting on several occasions to consider the implications of the policy on comprehensive education.

" This means, " he said, " that the supply of teachers in these subjects will continue to diminish and it may well lead, in a few years' time, to none being available. In our own science department by October will have only one qualified teacher of physics. This may mean that, in this subject, pupils will have to be lectured in groups of 50 or more - a very different thing from being taught in small groups of 20. "

The swing away from science , pure and applied, at University level was also alarming. It undoubtedly arose from the insecurity which pupils experienced when schools were short-staffed in mathematics and science , and teaching was, in consequence, unobtainable.

Mr Macfarlane stated that, by their letters and visits to the school, shown their anxiety and concern about the position in mathematics. Throughout the session, until Easter, they were dependent on four certificated teachers and a succession of students. then, after Easter, they were reduced to three permanent teachers - out of a staff of seven - and students. Their position would improve in that they were certain of two replacements but, unfortunately, the damage had been done.

Pointing out that Ardrossan Academy was supposed to become a comprehensive secondary school after 1970, Mr Macfarlane said : " This, of course, depends on adequate accommodation being provided by that date. Until then, we cannot but continue much as we are. Nevertheless, we must look ahead.

" The comprehensive school is designed to avoid the present arrangement where pupils are directed to different types of schools after the age of 12 and to enable all pupils from the primary departments to be in one unit for secondary education. By its very size, such a unit will have problems of a social nature which do not arise when a school is small or when it is selective.

" Although I shall not be altering the academic bias in the immediate future - I shall not, for example, exclude the possibility of a second language from the First Year - I must move towards a position where the school will have closer links with the community which it is ultimately to serve.

" A school with a primary department - as ours has been for the last 60 years - has usually much greater contact with parents than one which has no primary, and it is to this question that I and my staff will have to devote our thinking in the next two years.

" A Parents' Association might be part of the answer but it is only part of a very complex problem which involves pupils, parents, the neighbourhood, industry and the whole area from which the pupils are drawn. We shall not be altering the curriculum in the next two years but we shall endeavour to establish a link with the community in some way or other. "

In the present session, said Mr Macfarlane, they presented 414 candidates over all subjects in the Scottish Certificate of Education. Last session they had an 81 percent over all pass rate in higher grade presentations, and an 82 percent pass rate in lower grade presentations , comfortably above the national averages of 74 and 75 percent. Of 75 pupils who sat the promotions test, 47 had been given the opportunity to follow a secondary course with one or two foreign languages, the percentage of 64 comparing favourably with the county figure of 30 percent.

In the absence through illness of ex-Provost John Beggs, school convener, Provost J W Dawes presided over the ceremony which began with prayer by the Rev James Ewing, school chaplain. Pupils were addressed by Dr W G Lamont, Reader in Philosophy, University of Glasgow, whose wife presented the prizes. A vote of thanks was proposed by Dr E Y Nisbet, principal teacher of classics.

Ardrossan and Saltcoats Herald, 7th July 1967


Susan

User avatar
down south
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 3183
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 4:18 pm
Location: Cheshire,formerly Saltcoats

Re: Ardrossan Academy: Rector's reports 1958-61, 1967, 1971, 1972

Post by down south » Wed Sep 09, 2020 2:54 pm

We come now to 1971, and in this case there is only a brief summary of the Rector's speech, with most of the article in the Herald being given over to the speech given by the guest speaker at the prizegiving, Mr J Arnott, head of the department of drama at Glasgow University.

ARTS ARE ESSENTIAL SAYS HEAD OF DRAMA

Arts are not an extra but absolutely essential to the good life, said Mr J Arnott, guest speaker at Ardrossan Academy prizegiving on Monday.

Mr Arnott is a former pupil of the Academy and has has a distinguished career in the universities of Oxford and Glasgow. He is now head of the department of drama in Glasgow University.

Mr Arnott said that in starting a drama department he became aware that many of his ideas stemmed from his early days at Ardrossan Academy.

He spoke of the better opportunities people had for seeing art nowadays and mentioned the increasingly high standards of the Scottish Orchestra, the opportunities for seeing ballet regularly, the success story of Scottish Theatre Ballet and of Scottish Opera, and drama repertory companies, aspiring ultimately to become a Scottish National Theatre.

He added that many people considered putting money into the arts a waste and quoted a treasurer of Glasgow Corporation, who had been asked for £5000 by Scottish Theatre Ballet and said : " If you give them money they will spend it. "

He suggested that Shelley's words, " Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world, ", should be put in a contemporary context and the effect television and films have on people's lives should be considered.

The arts, he said, were communication in the widest possible sense of the word. During a play an actor expressed his experience of life most fully and this, Mr Arnott said, was not confined to the theatre only, as sociologists were now exploring the theory that society worked as pre-figured in the theatre.

" We play our parts in society because society creates roles, and education is learning to play one's role in society - a great deal of life is finding one's right role, " he said.

This did not make people hypocrites because a good actor was one who found the truth of the character. " In this case we are not putting on a show to sell ourselves, but in order to find ourselves. "

Mr Arnott said that no matter how much talent someone had, he had never known anyone get anywhere without putting in a great deal of hard work as well. " There are no small parts, only small actors " - and added : " If you are talented, play a role at which you can work hard and interpret with integrity . "

The rector, Mr Andrew Partridge, spoke of the new teaching block. He said the dining hall had been ready first and had been providing a high standard of cuisine for the last month or so. Teaching blocks will be ready in August for departments other than English, mathematics and classics.

He did not want to dwell on the difficulties of the past session but said : " We were not unaffected by having to operate in three buildings , " and added that he was deeply indebted to Mr Anderson and Mr Strong who had been in charge of Laighdykes and Stanley Schools respectively.

Ardrossan and Saltcoats Herald, 2nd July 1971


Susan

User avatar
down south
Mega Heid Poster
Mega Heid Poster
Posts: 3183
Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 4:18 pm
Location: Cheshire,formerly Saltcoats

Re: Ardrossan Academy: Rector's reports 1958-61, 1967, 1971, 1972

Post by down south » Wed Sep 16, 2020 2:56 pm

Finally we come to 1972, and this time the situation is reversed, with the Rector's speech getting the lion's share of the column inches but a brief summary of Sir Fitzroy Maclean's speech as well.

ARDROSSAN ACADEMY

Sir Fitzroy Maclean, MP, was the principal speaker at the annual prize-giving in Ardrossan Academy last week and in the course of his address he said that there was no such thing as the average person : " We are all individuals and each one of us should cultivate our individuality . "

" Do not be afraid to form opinions and to defend them , " said Sir Fitzroy, who urged the pupils to be adventurous - adventurous in the sense of looking for difficulties and overcoming them. They should, he said, go out and look for adventure ; they might go to other countries and find new experiences there, but equally they would find them at home in Scotland which had a great deal to offer.

" There is adventure in living as you get to know yourself and develop your character ," concluded Sir Fitzroy.

The Rector, Mr A Partridge, paid tribute to the late ex-Provost J W Dawes who was to have been the chairman at the closing ceremony. Provost Dawes had had a long association with Ardrossan Academy and was well liked by pupils and staff for his kindly, courteous and helpful way. With his death, Ardrossan Academy had lost a loyal and generous friend.

In his report the rector drew attention to the aerial photograph on the cover of this year's school magazine, which showed the old and new buildings making up Ardrossan Academy in 1972. This photograph symbolized what he hoped would be the policy of the school : on one hand to treasure what was best in the past and on the other hand to welcome what was new when it was good.

In the 1972 SCE examinations more than 490 pupils, the highest number in the history of the school, had been presented in a wide variety of subjects at ' O ' and ' H ' level. More than 40 candidates had been presented in the Certificate of Sixth Year Studies.

The rector referred to the wide range of extra-curricular activities which were in existence in the Academy. The school orchestra under the direction of Mr K Hetherington had had another busy and successful season. Besides two concerts in the school recitals had been given in West Kilbride, Kilmarnock and Largs, and at the Ayrshire Music Festival pupils from Ardrossan distinguished themselves in a wide range of entries.

The past session had been a memorable one for school drama. Theatre outings had been organised for both senior and junior pupils, the Drama Club had held a Hallowe'en concert and taken part in the Christmas concert. Mr A Brown's production of " Macbeth " had won highest praise from all who saw it, and a production by one of the Sixth Year pupils, Margaret Grant, had won the Senior Drama Trophy at the Ayrshire Schools Drama Festival.

At the annual Classics competition the school won the Senior Latin Trophy for the fifth year in succession and also a new trophy for Greek. The rector also made reference to the sporting activities of the school and the healthy state of the various clubs and societies.

Mr Partridge ended by urging the pupils to work hard at their studies, to involve themselves in some worthwhile leisure activities and to remember that education was not just the training of the mind but also of their character.

Lady Maclean presented the prizes and votes of thanks were given by Mr M G Buchan, depute rector, and Mr Leslie Callan.

Ardrossan and Saltcoats Herald, 7th July 1972


Susan

Post Reply